Chapter • Just as a mountaineer climbs a mountain – because it is there, so a good mathematics student studies new material because it is there. — JAMES B. BRISTOL • 7.1 Introduction Differential Calculus is centred on the concept of the derivative. The original motivation for the derivative was the problem of defining tangent lines to the graphs of functions and calculating the slope of such lines. Integral Calculus is motivated by the problem of defining and calculating the area of the region bounded by the graph of the functions. If a function f is differentiable in an interval I, i.e., its derivative f ′ exists at each point of I, then a natural question arises that given f ′at each point of I, can we determine the function? The functions that could possibly have given function as a derivative are called anti derivatives (or primitive) of the function. Further, the formula that gives all these anti derivatives is called the indefinite integral of the function and such process of finding anti derivatives is called integration. Such type of problems arise in many practical situations. For instance, if we know the instantaneous velocity of an object at any instant, then there arises a natural question, i.e., can we determine the position of the object at any instant? There are several such practical and theoretical situations where the process of integration is involved. The development of integral calculus arises out of the efforts of solving the problems of the following types: (a) the problem of finding a function whenever its derivative is given, (b) the problem of finding the area bounded by the graph of a function under certain conditions. These two problems lead to the two forms of the integrals, e.g., indefinite and definite integrals, which together constitute the Integral Calculus. There is a connection, known as the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, between indefinite integral and definite integral which makes the definite integral as a practical tool for science and engineering. The definite integral is also used to solve many interesting problems from various disciplines like economics, finance and probability. In this Chapter, we shall confine ourselves to the study of indefinite and definite integrals and their elementary properties including some techniques of integration. 7.2 Integration as an Inverse Process of Differentiation Integration is the inverse process of differentiation. Instead of differentiating a function, we are given the derivative of a function and asked to find its primitive, i.e., the original function. Such a process is called integration or anti differentiation. Let us consider the following examples: d We know that (sin x) = cos x ... (1) dxdx 3 ( ) = x2 ... (2) dx3 d and (ex )= ex ... (3) dx We observe that in (1), the function cos x is the derived function of sin x. We say 3 xthat sin x is an anti derivative (or an integral) of cos x. Similarly, in (2) and (3), and 3 ex are the anti derivatives (or integrals) of x 2 and ex, respectively. Again, we note that for any real number C, treated as constant function, its derivative is zero and hence, we can write (1), (2) and (3) as follows : d dx 32 dx x(sin x + C) = cos x , ( +C) = x and (e + C) = e dx dx 3 dx Thus, anti derivatives (or integrals) of the above cited functions are not unique. Actually, there exist infinitely many anti derivatives of each of these functions which can be obtained by choosing C arbitrarily from the set of real numbers. For this reason C is customarily referred to as arbitrary constant. In fact, C is the parameter by varying which one gets different anti derivatives (or integrals) of the given function. d xxMore generally, if there is a function F such that F ( ) = f ( ) , ∀ x ∈ I (interval),dx then for any arbitrary real number C, (also called constant of integration) d [F( )+C] = f (x), x ∈ Ix dxINTEGRALS 289 Thus, {F + C, C ∈ R} denotes a family of anti derivatives of f. Remark Functions with same derivatives differ by a constant. To show this, let g and h be two functions having the same derivatives on an interval I. Consider the function f = g – h defined by f (x) = g(x) – h (x), ∀ x ∈ I df Then = f′ = g′ – h′ giving f′ (x) = g′ (x) – h′ (x) ∀ x ∈ I dx or f′ (x) =0, ∀x ∈ I by hypothesis, i.e., the rate of change of f with respect to x is zero on I and hence f is constant. In view of the above remark, it is justified to infer that the family {F + C, C ∈ R} provides all possible anti derivatives of f. We introduce a new symbol, namely, f ()dx x which will represent the entire∫class of anti derivatives read as the indefinite integral of f with respect to x. Symbolically, we write f () dx = F( ) +C .xx∫ Notation Given that dy = f () x , we write y = ∫ f ()x dx . dx For the sake of convenience, we mention below the following symbols/terms/phrases with their meanings as given in the Table (7.1). Table 7.1 Symbols/Terms/Phrases Meaning f ( )x dx ∫ Integral of f with respect to x f (x) in f ( )x dx ∫ Integrand x in f ( )x dx ∫ Variable of integration Integrate Find the integral An integral of f A function F such that F′(x) = f (x) Integration The process of finding the integral Constant of Integration Any real number C, considered as constant function We already know the formulae for the derivatives of many important functions. From these formulae, we can write down immediately the corresponding formulae (referred to as standard formulae) for the integrals of these functions, as listed below which will be used to find integrals of other functions. Derivatives Integrals (Anti derivatives) n + 1 n + 1d ⎛ x ⎞ nx = xn (i) ⎜⎟ ; x dx =+ C, n ≠ –1∫dx ⎝ n + 1 ⎠n +1 Particularly, we note that d ( ) =1 dx +x ; = x C∫dx d (ii) (sin x)=cos x ; cos x dx = sin x + C dx ∫ d (iii) ( – cos x)=sin x ; sin x dx = – cos x + C dx ∫ d (iv) ( tan x)=sec 2 x ; sec 2 x dx = tan x + C∫dx d (v) ( – cot x)=cosec 2 x ; cosec x dx = – cot x + C dx ∫ 2 d (vi) (sec x)=sec x tan x ; sec x tan x dx = sec x + C dx ∫ d (vii) ( – cosec x)=cosec x cot x ; cosec x cot x dx = – cosec x + C dx ∫ d 1 dx –1 –1 sin x == sin x + C(viii) dx () 2 ; ∫ 21 –x 1 –x d 1 dx –1 –1( – cos x)== – cos x + C(ix) 2 ; ∫ 2dx 1 –x 1 –x d –1 1 dx –1 (x) ( tan x = 2 ; ∫ = tan x C) 2 + dx 1 +x 1 + x d dx –1 1 –1 – cot x == – cot x + C(xi) () 2 ; ∫ 2dx 1+x 1 + x INTEGRALS 291 (xii) (xiii) (xiv) (xv) (xvi) ( )– 1 2 1 sec d x dx x x =( )– 1 – cosec d x dx x =( x ) xd e e dx = ; ( ) 1 log | | d x dx x = ; x xd a a dx log a ⎛ ⎞ =⎜ ⎟ ⎝ ⎠ ; 1– ; 2 1 1x – ; – 1 2 sec C 1 dx x x x – = +∫ – 1 2 cosec C 1 dx – x x x – = +∫ Cx x e dx = e +∫ 1 log | | Cdx x x = +∫ C x x a a dx log a = +∫ 7.2.1 Geometrical interpretation of indefinite integral fxLet f (x) = 2x. Then ∫ () dx = x 2 + C . For different values of C, we get different integrals. But these integrals are very similar geometrically. Thus, y = x2 + C, where C is arbitrary constant, represents a family of integrals. By assigning different values to C, we get different members of the family. These together constitute the indefinite integral. In this case, each integral represents a parabola with its axis along y-axis. Clearly, for C = 0, we obtain y = x2, a parabola with its vertex on the origin. The curve y = x2 + 1 for C = 1 is obtained by shifting the parabola y = x2 one unit along y-axis in positive direction. For C = – 1, y = x 2 – 1 is obtained by shifting the parabola y = x 2 one unit along y-axis in the negative direction. Thus, for each positive value of C, each parabola of the family has its vertex on the positive side of the y-axis and for negative values of C, each has its vertex along the negative side of the y-axis. Some of these have been shown in the Fig 7.1. Let us consider the intersection of all these parabolas by a line x = a. In the Fig 7.1, we have taken a > 0. The same is true when a < 0. If the line x = a intersects the parabolas y = x 2, y = x 2 + 1, y = x 2 + 2, y = x 2 – 1, y = x 2 – 2 at P, P, P, P, P etc.,012–1 –2dy respectively, then at these points equals 2a. This indicates that the tangents to the dxcurves at these points are parallel. Thus, ∫ 2x dx 2 + FC x (say), implies that= x C = () Fig 7.1 the tangents to all the curves y = FC (x), C ∈ R, at the points of intersection of the curves by the line x = a, (a ∈ R), are parallel. fx xFurther, the following equation (statement) ( ) dx = F( ) + C = y (say) ,∫ represents a family of curves. The different values of C will correspond to different members of this family and these members can be obtained by shifting any one of the curves parallel to itself. This is the geometrical interpretation of indefinite integral. 7.2.2 Some properties of indefinite integral In this sub section, we shall derive some properties of indefinite integrals. (I) The process of differentiation and integration are inverses of each other in the sense of the following results : d ∫x dx f () = f (x)dx and f ′()x dx = f (x) + C, where C is any arbitrary constant.∫INTEGRALS 293 Proof Let F be any anti derivative of f, i.e., d xF() = f (x)dxThen f ()dx x = F(x) + C∫d ∫d Therefore f () = F()+C)x dx ( x dx dx d = F( )= x fx() dx Similarly, we note that d xf ′(x) = f () dx and hence f ′()dx x = f (x) + C∫where C is arbitrary constant called constant of integration. (II) Two indefinite integrals with the same derivative lead to the same family of curves and so they are equivalent. Proof Let f and g be two functions such that xdx xf () = g () dx d ∫d ∫dx dx d or ⎡ f () dx– gxdx ⎤ = 0x () ⎣∫∫⎦dx () x dx– g () dx Hence fx = C, where C is any real number (Why?)∫∫ or ∫f ()dx = ∫ g xdx + Cx () So the families of curves { f () dx + C ,C ∈R∫ x 1 }1 and () dx + C ,C ∈R{∫gx 22 } are identical. Hence, in this sense, f () dx and () dx are equivalent.x gx ∫∫() dx +C ,C ∈Rgx () dx +C ,C ∈ R is customarily expressed by writing f () dx = () dx , The equivalence of the families {∫ fx 11 } and x gx {∫ 22 } ∫∫ without mentioning the parameter. (III) [ f ( )+ gx dx = f () dx + () x () ] x gx dx ∫ ∫∫ Proof By Property (I), we have d ⎡ x ( )] dx ⎤ ... (1)[ f ( )+ gx = f (x) + g (x)⎣ ⎦dx ∫On the otherhand, we find that d dd x () () gx ⎡ f () dx + gx dx ⎤ = f x dx + () dx ⎣∫∫⎦∫ ∫dx dx dx = f (x) + g (x) ... (2) Thus, in view of Property (II), it follows by (1) and (2) that ( fx + () ) dx fxdx + () () gx = () gx dx .∫ ∫∫ kf () dx fdx (IV) For any real number k, x = k () x∫∫ d Proof By the Property (I), kf () dx x .x = kf () dx ∫ d Also d ⎡ f () dx ⎤ = k fxdx = xk x () kf () ⎣∫⎦∫dx dx kf x xdx Therefore, using the Property (II), we have ( ) dx = kf () .∫∫ (V) Properties (III) and (IV) can be generalised to a finite number of functions f , f , ..., f and the real numbers, k , k , ..., k giving12 n 12n12 () dx [ kf 1( ) x + kf2() x + ... + knfn x ]∫ = k f () dx + k f xdx + ... + kf () x () x dx .1 ∫ 12 ∫ 2 n ∫ n To find an anti derivative of a given function, we search intuitively for a function whose derivative is the given function. The search for the requisite function for finding an anti derivative is known as integration by the method of inspection. We illustrate it through some examples. INTEGRALS 295 Example 1 Write an anti derivative for each of the following functions using the method of inspection: 1 (i) cos 2x (ii) 3x2 + 4x3 (iii) , x ≠ 0 x Solution (i) We look for a function whose derivative is cos 2x. Recall that d sin 2x = 2 cos 2x dx1 dd ⎛ 1 ⎞ or cos 2x = (sin 2x) = ⎜ sin 2 x⎟ 2 dxdx ⎝ 2 ⎠ 1 Therefore, an anti derivative of cos 2x is sin2 x . 2 (ii) We look for a function whose derivative is 3x2 + 4x3. Note that d 34 23( x + x ) =3x + 4x . dx 3 34Therefore, an anti derivative of 3x 2 + 4x is x + x . (iii) We know that d 1 d 11 (log x) = ,x > 0 and [log ( –x)] = ( – 1) = ,x < 0 dx x dx –x x d 1 x )= ,x ≠ 0Combining above, we get ( log dx x ∫1 1 .xTherefore, dx = log is one of the anti derivatives of x x Example 2 Find the following integrals: 2x 3 – 1 3 x 1 (i) ∫ 2 dx (ii) (x3 + 1) dx (iii) ∫ (x2 + 2 e –) dx x ∫ x Solution (i) We have 31 – 2dx = xdx– x dx (by Property V)∫ x 2 – ∫∫ x 296 MATHEMATICS 1 + 1 – 2 + 1⎛ x ⎞⎛ x ⎞ + C – + C= ⎜ 1 ⎟⎜ 2 ⎟ ; C , C are constants of integration1 +1 – 2 +1 12⎝⎠⎝ ⎠ 2 – 1 2xx +C –– C x + 1 +C 1 – C2 = 1 2 = 2 – 12 x x 2 1 = + + C , where C = C – C is another constant of integration. 2 x 12(ii) We have 22 (x 3 + 1) dx = x 3 dx + dx ∫ ∫∫ 2 + 1 5 x33 = + x + C = x3 + x + C 2 5+1 3 33 2 x 2 x (iii) We have (x + 2 e– ) dx = x dx + 2 e dx– dx ∫ 1 ∫∫ ∫ 1 x x 3 + 1 x2 x+ 2 e – log x +C = 3 + 1 2 25 x = x 2 + 2 e – log x +C 5 Example 3 Find the following integrals: (i) (sin x + cos x) dx (ii) cosec x (cosec x + cot x) dx ∫ ∫ 1 – sin x dx (iii) ∫ 2 cos x Solution (i) We have (sin x + cos x) dx = sin x dx + cos x dx ∫ ∫∫ = – cos x + sin x + C INTEGRALS 297 (ii) We have (cosec x (cosec x + cot x) dx = cosec 2 x dx + cosec x cot x dx ∫ ∫∫ = – cot x– cosec x + C (iii) We have 1 – sin x 1 sin x dx = dx– dx ∫ 2 ∫ 2 ∫ 2 cos x cos x cos x = sec 2 xdx – tan x sec x dx ∫∫ = tan x– sec x + C Example 4 Find the anti derivative F of f defined by f (x) = 4x 3 – 6, where F (0) = 3 Solution One anti derivative of f (x) is x 4 – 6x since d 4 x(x – 6 ) =4x 3 – 6 dxTherefore, the anti derivative F is given by F(x) = x4 – 6x + C, where C is constant. Given that F(0) =3, which gives, 3 =0 – 6 × 0 + C or C = 3 Hence, the required anti derivative is the unique function F defined by F(x) = x4 – 6x + 3. Remarks (i) We see that if F is an anti derivative of f, then so is F + C, where C is any constant. Thus, if we know one anti derivative F of a function f, we can write down an infinite number of anti derivatives of f by adding any constant to F expressed by F(x) + C, C ∈ R. In applications, it is often necessary to satisfy an additional condition which then determines a specific value of C giving unique anti derivative of the given function. (ii) Sometimes, F is not expressible in terms of elementary functions viz., polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, trigonometric functions and their inverses etc. We are xtherefore blocked for finding f ()dx . For example, it is not possible to find∫ ∫22 –x e–x dx by inspection since we can not find a function whose derivative is e (iii) When the variable of integration is denoted by a variable other than x, the integral formulae are modified accordingly. For instance 4 + 1 4 y 15 y dy =+ C = y + C∫ 4 + 15 7.2.3 Comparison between differentiation and integration 1. Both are operations on functions. 2. Both satisfy the property of linearity, i.e., d dd x () ] x + k fx(i) [kf () + kf x = kf () () 1122 1122 dx dx dx x () ] x dx + kf () dx (ii) [ kf () + kf xdx = kf () x∫ 1 122 1 ∫ 12 ∫ 2 Here k and k are constants.123. We have already seen that all functions are not differentiable. Similarly, all functions are not integrable. We will learn more about nondifferentiable functions and nonintegrable functions in higher classes. 4. The derivative of a function, when it exists, is a unique function. The integral of a function is not so. However, they are unique upto an additive constant, i.e., any two integrals of a function differ by a constant. 5. When a polynomial function P is differentiated, the result is a polynomial whose degree is 1 less than the degree of P. When a polynomial function P is integrated, the result is a polynomial whose degree is 1 more than that of P. 6. We can speak of the derivative at a point. We never speak of the integral at a point, we speak of the integral of a function over an interval on which the integral is defined as will be seen in Section 7.7. 7. The derivative of a function has a geometrical meaning, namely, the slope of the tangent to the corresponding curve at a point. Similarly, the indefinite integral of a function represents geometrically, a family of curves placed parallel to each other having parallel tangents at the points of intersection of the curves of the family with the lines orthogonal (perpendicular) to the axis representing the variable of integration. 8. The derivative is used for finding some physical quantities like the velocity of a moving particle, when the distance traversed at any time t is known. Similarly, the integral is used in calculating the distance traversed when the velocity at time t is known. 9. Differentiation is a process involving limits.So is integration, as will be seen in Section 7.7. INTEGRALS 299 10. The process of differentiation and integration are inverses of each other as discussed in Section 7.2.2 (i). EXERCISE 7.1 Find an anti derivative (or integral) of the following functions by the method of inspection. 1. sin 2x 2. cos 3x 3. e 2x 4. (ax + b)2 5. sin 2x – 4 e 3x Find the following integrals in Exercises 6 to 20: 3 212 6. ∫ (4 ex + 1) dx 7. ∫ x (1 – x 2) dx 8. ∫ (ax + bx + c) dx 2 32 1 ⎞ x + 5x– 4⎛ 9. (2 x 2 + e dx 10. x– dx 11. dx ⎟∫ 2∫ x ) ∫⎜ x⎝ x ⎠ x 3 + 3x + 4 x 3 − x 2 + x– 1 12. ∫ dx 13. dx 14. (1 –x) x dx ∫ ∫ x x– 1 15. x(3 x 2 + 2x + 3) dx 16. (2 x– 3cos x + ex ) dx ∫ ∫ 17. (2 x 2 – 3sin x + 5 x) dx 18. sec x (sec x + tan x) dx ∫ ∫ 2 sec x 2 – 3sin xdx 19. ∫ 2 20. dx. cosec x ∫ 2 cos x Choose the correct answer in Exercises 21 and 22. ⎛ 1 ⎞ 21. The anti derivative of ⎜ x + ⎟ equals⎝ x ⎠1 1 2 1 21 (A) x3 + 2 x2 + C (B) x3 + x 2 + C 3 32 3 1 31 2 31 (C) x2 + 2 x2 + C (D) x2 + x2 + C 3 22 d 33 22. If fx = 4() x − such that f (2) = 0. Then f (x) is dx x 4 4 1129 3 1129 x +− x ++ x 38 x 48(A) (B) 1 129 1 129 (C) x 4 + 3 + (D) x 3 + 4 − x 8 x 8 7.3 Methods of Integration In previous section, we discussed integrals of those functions which were readily obtainable from derivatives of some functions. It was based on inspection, i.e., on the search of a function F whose derivative is f which led us to the integral of f. However, this method, which depends on inspection, is not very suitable for many functions. Hence, we need to develop additional techniques or methods for finding the integrals by reducing them into standard forms. Prominent among them are methods based on: 1. Integration by Substitution 2. Integration using Partial Fractions 3. Integration by Parts 7.3.1 Integration by substitution In this section, we consider the method of integration by substitution. The given integral f ()dx x can be transformed into another form by changing∫the independent variable x to t by substituting x = g (t). Consider I = xf ()dx ∫ dx Put x = g(t) so that = g′(t).dtWe write dx = g′(t) dt Thus I = f x dx = f (gt g′() ( ) ()) t dt ∫∫ This change of variable formula is one of the important tools available to us in the name of integration by substitution. It is often important to guess what will be the useful substitution. Usually, we make a substitution for a function whose derivative also occurs in the integrand as illustrated in the following examples. Example 5 Integrate the following functions w.r.t. x: (i) sin mx (ii) 2x sin (x 2 + 1) tan 4 x sec 2 x sin (tan – 1 x) (iii) (iv) x 1 + x 2 Solution (i) We know that derivative of mx is m. Thus, we make the substitution mx = t so that mdx = dt. ∫ 1 ∫1 1 Therefore, sin mx dx = sin t dt = – cos t + C = – cos mx + C mm m INTEGRALS 301 (ii) Derivative of x 2 + 1 is 2x. Thus, we use the substitution x 2 + 1 = t so that 2x dx = dt. Therefore, ∫ 2x sin ( x 2 + 1) dx = ∫sin t dt = – cos t + C = – cos (x 2 + 1) + C 1 1 – 1 (iii) Derivative of x is x 2 = . Thus, we use the substitution 22 x 1 x = t so that dx =dt giving dx = 2t dt. 2 x ∫ 4 2 2 tan 4 2t dt tan x sec x t t sec Thus, dx = = 2 tan 4 t sec 2t dt x ∫t ∫ Again, we make another substitution tan t = u so that sec2 t dt = du 5 42 4 Therefore, 2 tan t sec t dt = 2 u du = 2 + C∫∫u 5 25 = tan t +C (since u = tan t)5 25 = tan x + C (since t = x) 5 tan 4 x sec 2 x 2 dx = tan 5 x + CHence, ∫x 5 Alternatively, make the substitution tan x = t (iv) Derivative of tan – 1 x = 1 . Thus, we use the substitution 1+ x 2 dx tan–1 x = t so that = dt. 1 + x2 sin (tan – 1 x)Therefore , ∫ 2 dx = sin t dt = – cos t + C = – cos(tan–1 x) + C∫1 + x Now, we discuss some important integrals involving trigonometric functions and their standard integrals using substitution technique. These will be used later without reference. (i) ∫ tan x dx = log sec x +C We have sin x tan x dx = dx ∫∫ cos x Put cos x = t so that sin x dx = – dt Then tan x dx = – = – log t + C = – log cos x + C∫∫ dt t or tan x dx = log sec x + C∫ (ii) ∫ cot x dx = log sin x +C cos x cot x dx = dx We have ∫∫ sin x Put sin x = t so that cos x dx = dt dt Then ∫cot x dx = ∫t = log t +C = log sin x + C (iii) ∫ sec x dx = log sec x + tan x +C We have sec x (sec x + tan x) sec x dx = dx ∫∫ sec x + tan x Put sec x + tan x = t so that sec x (tan x + sec x) dx = dt dt Therefore, ∫ sec x dx = ∫ = log t +C = log sec x + tan x + C t (iv) ∫ cosec x dx = log cosec x – cot x +C We have cosec x(cosec x + cot x) cosec x dx = dx ∫∫ (cosec x + cot x) Put cosec x + cot x = t so that – cosec x (cosec x + cot x) dx = dt dt cosec x dx = – = –log| | t = – log|cosec x + cot x | + CSo ∫∫ t cosec 2 x − cot 2 x = – log + C cosec x − cot x log cosec x– cot x + C= Example 6 Find the following integrals: sin x 1 (i) ∫ sin 3 x cos 2 x dx (ii) ∫dx (iii) ∫ dx sin ( x + a)1 + tan x INTEGRALS 303 Solution (i) We have 32 22sin x cos x dx = sin x cos x ( sin x) dx ∫ ∫ = (1 –cos 2 x) cos 2 x (sin x) dx ∫ Put t = cos x so that dt = – sin x dx 22 22 Therefore, sin x cos x (sin x) dx = (1 – t ) t dt ∫ − ∫ ⎛ t 35 24 t ⎞ = – (t – t ) dt = – ⎜ – ⎟ + C∫ 35⎝ ⎠ 1 31 5 = – cos x + cos x + C 3 5 (ii) Put x + a = t. Then dx = dt. Therefore sin x sin ( t –a)dx = dt ∫∫sin ( x + a) sin t sin t cos a– cos t sin a dt = ∫ sin t = cos a dt – sin a cot t dt ∫∫ = (cos a) t– (sin a) ⎡log sin t + C ⎤1 ⎦⎣ = (cos a)( x + a) – (sin a) ⎡log sin ( x + a) + C ⎤1⎦⎣ = x cos a + a cos a– (sin a) log sin ( x + a) – C1 sin a sin x dx Hence, ∫ = x cos a – sin a log |sin (x + a)| + C,sin ( x + a) where, C = – C1 sin a + a cos a, is another arbitrary constant. dx cos x dx = (iii) ∫∫1 + tan x cos x + sin x 1 (cos x + sin x + cos x – sin x) dx = ∫2 cos x + sin x 1 1 cos x – sin x dx + dx = ∫∫2 2 cos x + sin x x C 1 cos x– sin x = + 1+ ∫ dx ... (1)2 2 2cos x + sin x cos x– sin x Now, consider I = dx ∫ cos x + sin x Put cos x + sin x = t so that (cos x – sin x) dx = dt ∫ dt t Therefore I == log t + C2= log cos x + sin x + C2 Putting it in (1), we get dx x C1 1 + C2= + + log cos x + sin x∫ 1 + tan x 222 2 x 1 + C1 + C2 = + log cos x + sin x 22 22 x 1 ⎛ C1 C2 ⎞ + log cos x + sin x + C, C =+= ⎜⎟ 22 ⎝ 22 ⎠ EXERCISE 7.2 Integrate the functions in Exercises 1 to 37: 2x ( log x)21 1. 2 2. 3. 1 + x xx + x log x 4. sin x sin (cos x) 5. sin ( ax + b) cos ( ax + b) 6. ax + b 7. xx + 2 8. x 1 + 2x 2 1 x 11. , x > 09. (4 x + 2) x 2 + x + 1 10. x– x x + 4 1 2 x 35 1 12. (x– 1) 3 x 13. 33 14. , x > 0, m≠1 (2 + 3x ) x (log x)m x x 2x + 315. 16. 17.2 e x 2 9 – 4x e INTEGRALS 305 – 1tan x 2 x 2x 2 –x e e–1 e –e 18. 19. 20.22x 2x– 2x1 + x e +1 e + e sin – 1 x 21. tan2 (2x – 3) 22. sec2 (7 – 4x) 23. 1 –x 2 2cos x– 3sin x 1 cos x 24. 25. 26. 6cos x + 4sin x cos 2 x (1 – tan x)2 x cos x 27. sin 2x cos 2x 28. 29. cot x log sin x 1 + sin x sin xsin x 1 30. 31. )2 32.1 + cos x (1 + cos x 1 + cot x 1 tan x (1 + log x)2 33. 34. 35. 1 – tan x sin x cos x x 3 – 14 (x +1) ( x + log x)2 x sin ( tan x )36. 37. 8 x 1 + x Choose the correct answer in Exercises 38 and 39. 10 x 9 +10 x log 10 dx 38. e equals∫10 x x +10 (A) 10x – x 10 + C (B) 10x + x 10 + C 10)–1(C) (10x – x + C (D) log (10x + x10) + C dx 39. equals ∫ 22sin x cos x (A) tan x + cot x + C (B) tan x – cot x +C (C) tan x cot x + C (D) tan x – cot 2x + C 7.3.2 Integration using trigonometric identities When the integrand involves some trigonometric functions, we use some known identities to find the integral as illustrated through the following example. ∫2 ∫ ∫ 3 Example 7 Find (i) cos x dx (ii) sin 2x cos 3x dx (iii) sin x dx Solution (i) Recall the identity cos 2x = 2 cos2 x – 1, which gives 1 + cos 2 x 2 cos x = 2 21 11 Therefore, ∫ cos x dx = (1+cos 2 ) dx = dx + cos 2 x xdx ∫ ∫∫2 22 x 1 = + sin 2 x + C 24 1 (ii) Recall the identity sin x cos y = [sin (x + y) + sin (x – y)] (Why?)2 1 Then ∫ sin 2 xcos 3 xdx = ⎡⎣∫ sin 5 x dx • ∫ sin x dx ⎤⎦2 1 ⎡ 1 ⎤ – cos 5 x + cos x + C= ⎢ ⎥2 ⎣ 5 ⎦ 11 = – cos 5 x + cos x + C 10 2 (iii) From the identity sin 3x = 3 sin x – 4 sin3 x, we find that 3sin x– sin 3 x sin3 x = 4 33 1 Therefore, sin x dx = sin x dx – sin 3 x dx ∫ 4 ∫ 4 ∫31 – cos x + cos 3 x + C= 4 12 32 2 Alternatively, sin x dx = sin x sin x dx = (1 – cos x) sin x dx ∫∫ ∫ Put cos x = t so that – sin x dx = dt 3 3 2 t Therefore, sin x dx = − ∫(1 –t 2 ) dt = – dt + t dt = –t ++ C∫∫∫ 3 13 = – cos x + cos x + C 3 Remark It can be shown using trigonometric identities that both answers are equivalent. INTEGRALS 307 EXERCISE 7.3 Find the integrals of the functions in Exercises 1 to 22: 1. sin2 (2x + 5) 2. sin 3x cos 4x 3. cos 2x cos 4x cos 6x 4. sin3 (2x + 1) 5. sin3 x cos3 x 6. sin x sin 2x sin 3x 1 – cos x cos x 7. sin 4x sin 8x 8. 9. 1 + cos x 1 + cos x sin 2 x 10. sin4 x 11. cos4 2x 12. 1 + cos x cos 2 x– cos 2 α cos x– sin x 13. 14. 15. tan3 2x sec 2x cos x– cos α 1 + sin 2 x 33 2sin x + cos x cos 2 x + 2sin x 16. tan4 x 17. 22 18. sin x cos x cos 2 x 1 cos 2 x 19. 3 20. 21. sin – 1 (cos x)sin x cos x ( cos x + sin x)2 1 22. cos ( x–a ) cos ( x–b ) Choose the correct answer in Exercises 23 and 24. sin 2 x − cos 2 x 23. dx is equal to ∫ 22sin x cos x (A) tan x + cot x + C (B) tan x + cosec x + C (C) – tan x + cot x + C (D) tan x + sec x + C ex (1 + x)24. dx equals ∫ 2 x cos (ex) (A) – cot (exx) + C (B) tan (xex) + C (C) tan (ex) + C (D) cot (ex) + C 7.4 Integrals of Some Particular Functions In this section, we mention below some important formulae of integrals and apply them for integrating many other related standard integrals: ∫ 2 dx 1 x – a (1) = log +C x – a 22a x + a ∫ 2 dx 1 a + x (2) 2= log +C a – x 2a a – x dx 1 x = tan – 1 + C(3) ∫ 22 x+a a a ∫ dx 22 (4) = log x + x – a +C 22 x – a (5) dx = sin – 1 x +C ∫ 2 2 aa – x dx 22(6) =log x + x +a +C ∫ 2 2 x +a We now prove the above results: 11 (1) We have 2 = x 2 –a (x–a )( x + a) 1 ⎡(x + a)–( x–a ) ⎤ 1 ⎡ 11 ⎤ = – = ⎢ ⎥⎢⎥2a ⎣ (x–a )( x + a) ⎦ 2a ⎣ x–a x + a ⎦ dx 1 ⎡ dx dx ⎤ Therefore, = ⎢ – ⎥∫ 22 ∫∫ x –a 2a x–a x + a⎣ ⎦ 1 = [log | (x–a )| – log ( |x + a)| ]+ C 2a 1 x–a = log + C 2a x + a (2) In view of (1) above, we have 11 ⎡ (a + x) + (a − x) ⎤ 11⎡ 1 ⎤= 22 ⎢⎥ = + a – x 2a (a + x)( a − x) ⎢⎥⎣⎦2a ⎣a − xa + x ⎦ INTEGRALS 309 Therefore, 2 2 – dx a x ∫ = 1 2a dx dx a x a x ⎡ ⎤ +⎢ ⎥− +⎣ ⎦∫ ∫ = 1 [ log | | log | |] C 2 a x a x a − − + + + = 1 log 2a a x a x + − C+ (3) Put x = a tan θ. Then dx = a sec2 θ dθ. dx a sec 2 θ dθ Therefore, ∫2 2 = ∫ 22 2 x + aa tan θ + a 11 1 –1 x = dθ = θ + C = tan + C∫ aa aa (4) Let x = a secθ. Then dx = a secθ tan θ d θ. dx a secθ tanθ dθ Therefore, ∫= ∫22 222 x − aa sec θ − a = secθ dθ = log secθ + tanθ + C1∫ 2 xx = log + – 1 + C12 aa 22 = log x + x –a − log a + C1 22 = log x + x –a + C , whereC = C1 – log |a| (5) Let x = a sinθ. Then dx = a cosθ dθ. dx a cos θ dθ Therefore, =∫22 ∫ 2 22 a − x a–a sin θ ∫ x = dθ = θ +C = sin – 1 + C a (6) Let x = a tan θ. Then dx = a sec2 θ dθ. dx a sec 2θ dθ Therefore, =∫∫22 222 x + aa tan θ + a = secθ dθ = log (sec θ + tan θ) + C1∫ 2 xx log ++1 + C12= aa 2 2log x + x + a − log |a| + C1= 2 2log x + x + a= + C, where C = C1 – log |a| Applying these standard formulae, we now obtain some more formulae which are useful from applications point of view and can be applied directly to evaluate other integrals. dx (7) To find the integral ∫ 2 , we write ax + bx + c ⎡⎤⎡ 2 bc ⎤⎛ b ⎞2 ⎛ cb2 ⎞ ax 2 + bx + c = ax + x += a ⎢ x ++ ⎜ – ⎟⎥⎢ ⎥⎜⎟ 2⎣ aa ⎦ ⎢⎝ 2a ⎠ a 4a ⎠⎥⎦⎣⎝ cb2 Now, put x + b = t so that dx = dt and writing – 2 =± k2 . We find the a 4a2a 1 dt ⎛ cb2 ⎞ –integral reduced to the form ∫2 2 depending upon the sign of ⎜ 2 ⎟ at ± k ⎝ a 4a ⎠ and hence can be evaluated. ∫ 2 dx (8) To find the integral of the type , proceeding as in (7), we ax + bx + c obtain the integral using the standard formulae. px + q (9) To find the integral of the type ∫ 2 dx , where p, q, a, b, c are ax + bx + c constants, we are to find real numbers A, B such that d 2 px + q =A (ax + bx + c)+ B = A (2 ax + b) +B dx To determine A and B, we equate from both sides the coefficients of x and the constant terms. A and B are thus obtained and hence the integral is reduced to one of the known forms. INTEGRALS 311 ( px + q) dx (10) For the evaluation of the integral of the type , we proceed∫ 2 ax + bx + c as in (9) and transform the integral into known standard forms. Let us illustrate the above methods by some examples. Example 8 Find the following integrals: dx dx (i) ∫ 2 (ii) ∫ x −16 22 x − x Solution dx dx 1 x– 4 (i) We have = = log + C [by 7.4 (1)]∫ 2 ∫2 x −16 x– 42 8 x + 4 dx dx (ii) =∫ 2 ∫ 22x − x 1–(x–1) Put x – 1 = t. Then dx = dt. dx dt – 1 Therefore, ∫= ∫= sin () t + C [by 7.4 (5)] 2 x − x 21 –t 2 = sin – 1(x – 1) + C Example 9 Find the following integrals : dx dx dx (i) ∫ 2 (ii) ∫ 2 (iii) ∫ 2 x − 6x +13 3x +13 x −10 5x − 2x Solution (i) We have x2 – 6x + 13 = x2 – 6x + 32 – 32 + 13 = (x – 3)2 + 4 So, ∫2 dx = ∫ 12 dx x − 6x +13 ( x– 3)2 + 2 Let x – 3 = t. Then dx = dt dx dt 1 t Therefore, ∫2 = ∫ 2 = tan – 1 + C [by 7.4 (3)] x − 6x +13 t 2 + 22 2 1 x– 3 = tan – 1 + C 22 (ii) The given integral is of the form 7.4 (7). We write the denominator of the integrand, ⎛ 2 13 x 10 ⎞ 23 x + –3x +13 x– 10 = ⎜ ⎟⎝ 33 ⎠ ⎡⎤⎛ 13 ⎞2 ⎛17 ⎞2 3 ⎢ x + ⎟ – ⎟⎥= ⎜⎜ (completing the square)⎢⎝ 6 ⎠⎝ 6 ⎠⎥⎣ ⎦ 1 dx ∫2 dx Thus = ∫ 22 3x +13 x −10 3 ⎛ 13 ⎞ ⎛17 ⎞ x +−⎜ ⎟⎜⎟⎝ 6 ⎠⎝ 6 ⎠ 13 Put x += t . Then dx = dt. 6 dx 1 dt Therefore, ∫2 = ∫ 2 3x +13 x −10 3 2 ⎛ 17 ⎞ t − ⎜⎟⎝ 6 ⎠ 17 t– 1 6 = log + C1 [by 7.4 (i)]17 17 3 × 2× t + 6 6 13 17 x + – 1 66log + C1= 13 17 17 x ++ 66 1 6x − 4 = log + C1 17 6x + 30 1 3x − 2 11 log + C1 + log = 17 x + 5 17 3 1 3x − 2 11 = log + C, where C = C1 + log 17 x + 5 17 3 INTEGRALS 313 dx dx =(iii) We have ∫ ∫ 5x 2− 2x ⎛ 22 x ⎞ 5 x–⎜⎟⎝ 5 ⎠ 1 ∫dx = (completing the square)5 22⎛ 1 ⎞⎛ 1 ⎞ x– –⎜ ⎟⎜⎟55⎝ ⎠⎝⎠ 1 x– = tPut . Then dx = dt. 5 dx 1 dt Therefore, = ∫ 2∫25x − 2x 52 ⎛ 1 ⎞ t– ⎜⎟⎝ 5 ⎠ 1 2 ⎛ 1 ⎞2 log t + t– = + C [by 7.4 (4)]⎜⎟ 5 ⎝ 5 ⎠ 1 1 22x log x– + x– + C= 5 55 Example 10 Find the following integrals: x + 2 x + 3 dx dx (i) ∫ 2 (ii) ∫ 22x + 6x + 55 − 4x + x Solution (i) Using the formula 7.4 (9), we express x + 2 = A d (2x 2 + 6x + 5)+B = A(4 x + 6) + B dx Equating the coefficients of x and the constant terms from both sides, we get 11 4A = 1 and 6A + B = 2 or A = and B = . 42 x + 2 14x + 61 dx dx +Therefore, ∫2 = ∫ 2 ∫ 22x + 6x + 5 42x + 6x + 5 22 x + 6x + 5 11 = I1 +I2 (say) ... (1)42 In I1, put 2x 2 + 6x + 5 = t, so that (4x + 6) dx = dt dt Therefore, I = = log t + C11∫ t = log|2 x 2 + 6 x + 5| + C1 ... (2) dx 1 dx = and I = ∫ 2 ∫22x + 6x + 522 5 x + 3x + 2 1 dx = ∫ 222 ⎛ 3 ⎞⎛ 1 ⎞ ⎜ x + ⎜⎟ + ⎟⎝ 2 ⎠⎝ 2 ⎠ 3 Put x += t , so that dx = dt, we get 2 1 dt 1 I2 = ∫2 = tan –12t + C2 [by 7.4 (3)]22 ⎛ 1 ⎞ × 1 t + ⎜ ⎟ 22⎝ 2 ⎠ –1 ⎛ 3 ⎞ –1 tan 2 x + +C tan 2x + 3 +C = ⎜⎟ 2 = () 2 ... (3)⎝ 2 ⎠Using (2) and (3) in (1), we get x + 21 1 – 1dx = log 2x 2 + 6x + 5 + tan ( 2x + 3)+ C∫ 22x + 6x + 54 2 where, C = C1 + C2 42 (ii) This integral is of the form given in 7.4 (10). Let us express d 2 x + 3 = A (5 – 4x–x )+B = A (– 4 – 2x) + Bdx Equating the coefficients of x and the constant terms from both sides, we get 1 – 2A = 1 and – 4 A + B = 3, i.e., A = – and B = 1 2 INTEGRALS 315 x + 31 (– 4 –2 x) dx dx +dx = – ∫Therefore, ∫22 2 ∫ 2 5 − 4x − x 5 − 4x − x 5 − 4x − x 1 = – I + I ... (1)212 In I1, put 5 – 4x – x2 = t, so that (– 4 – 2x) dx = dt. ( – 4 − 2 x dx ) dt Therefore, I = = = 2 t + C11 ∫ 2 ∫t5 − 4x − x + C ... (2)1 dx dx =Now consider I2 = ∫ ∫ 5 − 4x − x 29 – (x + 2) 2 Put x + 2 = t, so that dx = dt. dt – 1 t Therefore, I2 = ∫ 22 = sin + C 2 [by 7.4 (5)]33 − t – 1 x + 2 = sin + C2 ... (3)3 Substituting (2) and (3) in (1), we obtain x + 3 x + 2C2 – 1 = – 5– 4x – x + sin + C , where C = C2 – 1∫ 2 325 – 4x– x EXERCISE 7.4 Integrate the functions in Exercises 1 to 23. 3x 21 1 1. 6 2. 3. x +11 + 4x 2 (2 –x )2 +1 13xx 2 5. 4 6. 1+ 2 x 1− x 6 x– 1 x 2 sec 2 x 7. 8. 9. 66 2 x 2 – 1 x + a tan x + 4 11 1 10. 11. 2 12. 22 9 x + 6x + 57 – 6x– xx + 2x + 2 11 1 14.13. x– 1 x– 2 2 15. ( x–a )( x – b )()( ) 8 + 3x–x 4 x +1 x + 25x − 2 16. 17. 18. 22 21+ 2 x + 3x2x + x– 3 x– 1 6 x + 7 x + 2 x + 2 19. 20. 21. ( x– 5)( x– 4) 4x–x 2 x 2 + 2x + 3 5x + 3x + 3 22. 23. x 2 – 2x − 5 Choose the correct answer in Exercises 24 and 25. 24. equals ∫ 2 dx x + 2x + 2 (A) x tan–1 (x + 1) + C (B) tan–1 (x + 1) + C (C) (x + 1) tan–1 x + C (D) tan–1 x + C ∫ dx 2 equals 25. 9 x − 4x 1 –1 ⎛ 9x − 8 ⎞ 1 –1 ⎛ 8x − 9 ⎞(A) sin ⎟ + C (B) sin ⎟ + C⎜ ⎜ 9 ⎝ 8 ⎠ 2 ⎝ 9 ⎠ 1 ⎛ 9x − 8 ⎞1 –1 ⎛ 9x −8 ⎞ –1sin + C(C) sin ⎜ + C (D) ⎜⎟⎟ 2 ⎝ 9 ⎠3 ⎝ 8 ⎠ 7.5 Integration by Partial Fractions Recall that a rational function is defined as the ratio of two polynomials in the form P( ) x , where P (x) and Q(x) are polynomials in x and Q(x) ≠ 0. If the degree of P(x) Q( ) x is less than the degree of Q(x), then the rational function is called proper, otherwise, it is called improper. The improper rational functions can be reduced to the proper rational INTEGRALS 317 P( ) x P() P() xx functions by long division process. Thus, if is improper, then = x 1T( ) + , Q( ) xQ( ) x Q( ) x P( ) x where T(x) is a polynomial in x and 1is a proper rational function. As we know Q( ) x how to integrate polynomials, the integration of any rational function is reduced to the integration of a proper rational function. The rational functions which we shall consider here for integration purposes will be those whose denominators can be factorised into P( ) x P( ) x linear and quadratic factors. Assume that we want to evaluate ∫ Q( ) x dx , where Q( ) x is proper rational function. It is always possible to write the integrand as a sum of simpler rational functions by a method called partial fraction decomposition. After this, the integration can be carried out easily using the already known methods. The following Table 7.2 indicates the types of simpler partial fractions that are to be associated with various kind of rational functions. Table 7.2S.No. Form of the rational function Form of the partial fraction 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. ( – ) ( – ) px q x a x b + , a ≠ b A B x – a x – b + 2( – ) px q x a + ( )2 A B x – a x – a + 2 ( – ) ( ) ( ) px qx r x a x – b x – c + + A B C x – a x – b x – c + + 2 2( – ) ( ) px qx r x a x – b + + 2 A B C ( )x – a x – b x – a + + 2 2( – ) ( ) px qx r x a x bx c + + + + 2 A Bx + C x – a x bx c + + + , where x 2 + bx + c cannot be factorised further In the above table, A, B and C are real numbers to be determined suitably. dx Example 11 Find ∫ (x +1) ( x + 2) Solution The integrand is a proper rational function. Therefore, by using the form of partial fraction [Table 7.2 (i)], we write 1 AB = + ... (1)(x +1) ( x +2) x +1 x + 2 where, real numbers A and B are to be determined suitably. This gives 1 =A (x + 2) + B (x + 1). Equating the coefficients of x and the constant term, we get A + B =0 and 2A + B =1 Solving these equations, we get A =1 and B = – 1. Thus, the integrand is given by 1 1–1 = + (x +1) ( x +2) x +1 x + 2 dx dx dx –Therefore, ∫ = ∫∫(x +1) ( x + 2) x +1 x + 2 Remark The equation (1) above is an identity, i.e. a statement true for all (permissible) values of x. Some authors use the symbol ‘≡’ to indicate that the statement is an identity and use the symbol ‘=’ to indicate that the statement is an equation, i.e., to indicate that the statement is true only for certain values of x. x 2 +1 Example 12 Find dx ∫ 2 x − 5x + 6 x 2 + 1 Solution Here the integrand 2 is not proper rational function, so we divide x– 5x +6 x 2 + 1 by x 2 – 5x + 6 and find that INTEGRALS 319 25x– 55x– 5x +1 1+=1 + x 2 – 5x +6 = x 2 – 5x + 6(x– 2) ( x– 3) 5x– 5 AB Let = + (x– 2) ( x–3) x– 2 x– 3 So that 5x – 5 =A (x – 3) + B (x – 2) Equating the coefficients of x and constant terms on both sides, we get A + B = 5 and 3A + 2B = 5. Solving these equations, we get A = – 5 and B = 10 x 2 +1 510 Thus, 2 =1−+ x– 5x +6 x– 2 x– 3 x 2 +11 dx Therefore, dx = dx − 5 dx + 10 ∫2 ∫∫ ∫ x– 5x + 6 x– 2 x– 3 = x – 5 log |x – 2| + 10 log |x – 3| + C. 3x − 2 Example 13 Find ∫ 2 dx (x +1) ( x + 3) Solution The integrand is of the type as given in Table 7.2 (4). We write 3x– 2 ABC = ++ 22(x +1) ( x +3) x +1(x +1) x + 3 So that 3x – 2 =A (x + 1) (x + 3) + B (x + 3) + C (x + 1)2 =A (x2 + 4x + 3) + B (x + 3) + C (x2 + 2x + 1 ) Comparing coefficient of x2, x and constant term on both sides, we get A + C = 0, 4A + B + 2C = 3 and 3A + 3B + C = – 2. Solving these equations, we get 11 –5 –11 A = ,B = and C = . Thus the integrand is given by 42 4 3x − 2 11 511 –– 2 = 2(x +1) ( x +3) 4( x +1) 2( x +1) 4( x + 3) 3x − 2 11 dx 5 dx 11 dx Therefore, ∫2 = ∫ – ∫ 2 − ∫(x +1) ( x + 3) 4 x +12(x +1) 4 x + 3 = 11 log 4 +1 x 5 11 log 2 ( + 1) 4x + − 3x + C+ = 11 log 4 +1 + 3 x x 5 + C 2 ( +1) x + 2 x dx Example 14 Find ∫ 22(x +1) ( x + 4) 2 x Solution Consider and put x2 = y. (x 2 +1) ( x 2 +4) 2 xy Then = (x 2 + 1) ( x 2 +4) (y + 1) ( y + 4) y AB Write = + (y + 1) ( y +4) y +1 y + 4 So that y = A (y + 4) + B (y + 1) Comparing coefficients of y and constant terms on both sides, we get A + B = 1 and 4A + B = 0, which give 14 − and B =A = 33 x 2 14 Thus, = – + 22 22(x + 1) ( x +4) 3( x +1) 3( x + 4) x 2dx 1 dx 4 dx Therefore, = – +∫22 ∫ 2 ∫ 2(x +1) ( x + 4) 3 x +13 x + 4 1 41 x – 1 – 1 = – tan x +× tan + C 3 322 12 x– 1 – 1 = – tan x + tan + C 3 32 In the above example, the substitution was made only for the partial fraction part and not for the integration part. Now, we consider an example, where the integration involves a combination of the substitution method and the partial fraction method. (3 sin φ – 2) cos φ Example 15 Find dφ∫ 25 – cos φ – 4 sin φ Solution Let y = sin φ Then dy = cosφ dφ INTEGRALS 321 ( 3 sin φ – 2) cos φ (3 y – 2) dy Therefore, ∫2 d φ = ∫ 25 – cos φ – 4 sin φ 5 – (1 –y ) – 4 y 3 y– 2 =2 dy ∫ y– 4y + 4 3y– 2 = I (say) = ∫ )2( y– 2 3 y– 2A B Now, we write = + [by Table 7.2 (2)] ( y–2)2 y − 2(y − 2) 2 Therefore, 3y – 2 =A (y – 2) + B Comparing the coefficients of y and constant term, we get A = 3 and B – 2A = – 2, which gives A = 3 and B = 4. Therefore, the required integral is given by 34 dy dy I =[+ ] dy = 3 +4 ∫2 ∫∫ 2 y– 2(y– 2) y– 2(y– 2) ⎛ 1 ⎞ = 3 log y − 2 4 – ⎟ + C+ ⎜ y − 2⎝⎠ 4 = 3 log sin φ− 2 ++ C 2 – sin φ 4 = 3 log (2 − ) (since, 2 – sin φ is always positive)sin φ+ +C 2 − sin φx 2 + x +1 dx Example 16 Find ∫ 2(x + 2) ( x +1) Solution The integrand is a proper rational function. Decompose the rational function into partial fraction [Table 2.2(5)]. Write x 2 + x +1 ABx +C + (x 2 + 1) ( x +2) = x + 2(x 2 +1) Therefore, x2 + x + 1 =A (x2 + 1) + (Bx + C) (x + 2) Equating the coefficients of x 2, x and of constant term of both sides, we get A + B =1, 2B + C = 1 and A + 2C = 1. Solving these equations, we get 32 1 A = ,B = and C = 55 5 Thus, the integrand is given by 21 2 x + x + x +13 31 ⎛ 2x +1 ⎞55 = + = + 22 ⎜ 2 ⎟ (x + 1) ( x +2) 5( x + 2) x +1 5( x + 2) 5 ⎝ x +1 ⎠ x 2 + x +13 dx 12 x 11 Therefore, ∫2 dx = ∫ + ∫ 2 dx + ∫ 2 dx (x +1) ( x + 2) 5 x + 25 x +15 x +1 3 1 1 –1 = log x + 2 + log x 2 +1 + tan x + C 5 5 5 EXERCISE 7.5 Integrate the rational functions in Exercises 1 to 21. x 13x– 1 1. 2.3. (x +1) ( x + 2) x 2 – 9(x– 1) ( x– 2) ( x– 3) x 2x 1–x 2 4. 5. 2 6. (x– 1) ( x– 2) ( x– 3) x + 3x + 2 x (1 – 2x) xx 3x + 5 7. 8.9. 32 (x 2 + 1) ( x –1) (x– 1) 2 (x + 2) x –x − x + 1 2x − 35xx 3 + x +1 10. 11. 12.2 22(x–1) (2 x + 3) (x +1) ( x − 4) x −1 23x– 11 13. 2 14. 2 15. 4(1 − x) (1 + x )(x + 2) x −1 1 n – 1n16. n [Hint: multiply numerator and denominator by x and put x = t ]x (x + 1) cos x 17. [Hint : Put sin x = t](1 – sin x) (2 – sin x) INTEGRALS 323 (x 2 +1) ( x 2 + 2) 2x 1 18. 19. 20.2222 4(x + 3)( x + 4) (x + 1) ( x + 3) x (x–1) 1 (e–1) 21. x [Hint : Put ex = t] Choose the correct answer in each of the Exercises 22 and 23. ∫x dx 22. equals(x −1) ( x − 2) (x −1) 2 (x − 2) 2 + C (B) log + C(A) log x − 2 x −1 ⎛ x −1 ⎞2 (C) log ⎜⎟ + C (D) log (x −1) ( x − 2) + C⎝ x − 2 ⎠ dx 23. equals∫ 2 x (x + 1) 12 12 x − log ( x +1)+C (B) log x + log ( x +1) + C (A) log 22 1 x + log ( x 2+1) + C 2 (C) −log x + 1log ( x 2+1) + C (D) log 2 7.6 Integration by Parts In this section, we describe one more method of integration, that is found quite useful in integrating products of functions. If u and v are any two differentiable functions of a single variable x (say). Then, by the product rule of differentiation, we have d dv du (uv ) = u + v dxdx dx Integrating both sides, we get dv du uv = u dx + v dx ∫∫dx dx dv du or u dx = uv– v dx ... (1)∫∫dx dx dv Let u = f (x) and = g(x). Thendx du ()dx = f ′(x) and v = gx dx ∫ Therefore, expression (1) can be rewritten as () gx () dx = fx () dx – [ () dx ] f ′() dx fx () gx gx x∫ ∫∫∫ i.e., ( ) g () dx = fx g () dx – [ f () gx dx ]fx x () x ′ x () dx ∫ ∫∫∫ If we take f as the first function and g as the second function, then this formula may be stated as follows: “The integral of the product of two functions = (first function) × (integral of the second function) – Integral of [(differential coefficient of the first function) × (integral of the second function)]” Example 17 Find x cos x dx ∫ Solution Put f (x) = x (first function) and g (x) = cos x (second function). Then, integration by parts gives x cos xdx x cos x dx – [ () cos x dx ] dx ∫ = ∫∫ dx d x ∫ = x sin x– ∫sin x dx = x sin x + cos x + C Suppose, we take f (x) = cos x and g (x) = x. Then x cos x dx cos x xdx – [ (cos x)]= x dx dx ∫ ∫∫ dx d ∫ 22 xx = (cos x)+ ∫ sin x dx 22 Thus, it shows that the integral x cos x dx is reduced to the comparatively more∫complicated integral having more power of x. Therefore, the proper choice of the first function and the second function is significant. Remarks (i) It is worth mentioning that integration by parts is not applicable to product of functions in all cases. For instance, the method does not work for x sin x dx .∫ The reason is that there does not exist any function whose derivative is x sin x. (ii) Observe that while finding the integral of the second function, we did not add any constant of integration. If we write the integral of the second function cos x INTEGRALS 325 as sin x + k, where k is any constant, then x cos x dx = x (sin x + k) − (sin x + k) dx ∫ ∫ = x (sin x + k) − (sin x dx − k dx ∫∫ = x (sin x + k) − cos x –kx +C = x sin x + cos x + C This shows that adding a constant to the integral of the second function is superfluous so far as the final result is concerned while applying the method of integration by parts. (iii) Usually, if any function is a power of x or a polynomial in x, then we take it as the first function. However, in cases where other function is inverse trigonometric function or logarithmic function, then we take them as first function. Example 18 Find log x dx ∫ Solution To start with, we are unable to guess a function whose derivative is log x. We take log x as the first function and the constant function 1 as the second function. Then, the integral of the second function is x. d Hence, ∫(logx.1) dx = log x ∫1 dx − ∫[ dx (log x) ∫1 dx ] dx ∫ 1 = (log x) ⋅ x – x dx = x log x– x + C. x x Example 19 Find ∫ xe dx Solution Take first function as x and second function as ex. The integral of the second function is ex . xx xTherefore, ∫ x e dxx = xe − ∫1⋅ e dx = xex – e + C. x sin – 1 x dx Example 20 Find ∫ 21− x x Solution Let first function be sin – 1 x and second function be x dx First we find the integral of the second function, i.e., Put t =1 – x 2. Then dt = – 2x dx 326 MATHEMATICS x dx 1 dt Therefore, = – = – t =− 1 − x 2∫22 ∫t1 − x x sin – 1 x– 121 2 Hence, dx = (sin x) ( – 1 − x − ( – 1 − x ) dx ) ∫∫1− x 21 − x 2 2 − 12 − 1 = – 1− x sin x + x +C = x– 1 − x sin x + C Alternatively, this integral can also be worked out by making substitution sin–1 x = θ and then integrating by parts. Example 21 Find ex sin x dx ∫ Solution Take ex as the first function and sin x as second function. Then, integrating by parts, we have xx xI = e sin x dx = e ( – cos x) + e cos x dx ∫∫ =– ex cos x + I1 (say) ... (1) Taking ex and cos x as the first and second functions, respectively, in I1, we get I = ex sin x– ex sin x dx 1∫ Substituting the value of I in (1), we get1I =– ex cos x + ex sin x – I or 2I = ex (sin x – cos x) x Hence, I = e sin x dx = (sin x– cos x)+C ∫ xe 2 Alternatively, above integral can also be determined by taking sin x as the first function and ex the second function. 7.6.1 Integral of the type ex [ fx f ( )] dx ( )+ ′ x∫ x x ( )] ex + e ′ xWe have I = ∫e [ f ( )+ f ′ x dx = ∫ xf () dx ∫ xf () dx =I ex f ′ x dx , where I = ex f () dx ... (1)() x1 + ∫ 1 ∫ Taking f(x) and ex as the first function and second function, respectively, in I1 and xx + Cintegrating it by parts, we have I1 = f (x) ex – f ′() e dx ∫ Substituting I1 in (1), we get x xx I = ef () − f ′ x edx + ef ′() x () x dx + C = ex f (x) + C∫∫INTEGRALS 327 Thus, e [ f ( x)+f ′(x )] dx = ex f (x) + C∫ x 1(x 2 +1) ex x– 1Example 22 Find (i) e (tan x + ) dx (ii) dx∫ 2 ∫ 1 + x (x + 1) 2 Solution x– 11 (i) We have I = e (tan x + ) dx ∫ 21 + x 1 Consider f (x) = tan– 1 x, then f ′(x) = 21+ x Thus, the given integrand is of the form ex [ f (x) + f ′(x)]. x– 1 xTherefore, I = e (tan x + ) dx = e tan– 1 x + C∫121+ x 2 x 2(x +1) e xx– 1 +1+1) (ii) We have I dx e [] dx = ∫ 2 = ∫ 2(x +1) (x +1) xx 2 – 12 x x– 12 = e [ + ] dx e [+ ] dx 22 2∫ = ∫(x +1) (x+1) x +1 (x+1) x −1 2 f () = Consider f () = , then 2x ′ x (x +1) x +1 Thus, the given integrand is of the form ex [f (x) + f ′(x)]. x 2 +1 xx −1 xTherefore, e dx = e + C∫ 2(x +1) x +1 EXERCISE 7.6 Integrate the functions in Exercises 1 to 22. 1. x sin x 2. x sin 3x 3. x2 ex 4. x log x 5. x log 2x 6. x 2 log x 7. x sin– 1 x 8. x tan–1 x −1 x cos x 9. x cos–1 x 10. (sin–1 x)2 11. 12. x sec2 x 1− x 2 13. tan–1x 14. x (log x)2 15. (x2 + 1) log x 328 MATHEMATICS x xe ⎛ 1 + sin x ⎞ 16. ex (sinx + cosx) 17. 2 18. ex ⎜⎟ (1 + x) ⎝1 + cos x ⎠ x ⎛ 11 ⎞ (x − 3) ex 19. e ⎜ –2 ⎟ 20. 3 21. e 2x sin x⎝ x x ⎠ (x −1) ⎛ 2x ⎞ sin – 1 22. ⎜ 2 ⎟⎝ 1+ x ⎠ Choose the correct answer in Exercises 23 and 24. 2 x 3 23. xe dx equals∫11 x x 2 (A) e 3 + C (B) e + C 3 3 31 x 1 (C) e + C (D) ex 2 + C 2 2 24. ex sec x (1 + tan x) dx equals∫(A) ex cos x + C (B) ex sec x + C (C) ex sin x + C (D) ex tan x + C 7.6.2 Integrals of some more types Here, we discuss some special types of standard integrals based on the technique of integration by parts : 22 2222(i) x − a dx (ii) x + a dx (iii) a − x dx ∫ ∫∫ (i) Let I = ∫ Taking constant function 1 as the second function and integrating by parts, we have 1 x22 2 xx − a − x dx I = ∫ 222 x − a 222 ∫2 x − a + ax 2222 xa dx = xx − a − dx = x −− ∫ x 2 − 2 x 2 − a 2 a INTEGRALS 329 ∫ dx 22 222 = xx − a − x − a dx − a∫ x 2 − a 2 22 2 dx = xx − a − I − a ∫ 22 x − a 22 2 dx or 2I = xx − a − a ∫ x 2 − a 2 2 x a 2222 22 x + x – a +C or I = ∫ x –a dx = x – a – log 22 Similarly, integrating other two integrals by parts, taking constant function 1 as the second function, we get 2 22 221 a 22 (ii) x + a dx = xx + a + log x + x + a +C ∫ 22 2 22 22–1 1 ax (iii) a – x dx = xa – x + sin +C ∫ 22 a Alternatively, integrals (i), (ii) and (iii) can also be found by making trigonometric substitution x = a secθ in (i), x = a tanθ in (ii) and x = a sin θ in (iii) respectively. Example 23 Find ∫ Solution Note that x 2 + 2x + 5 dx =(x +1) 2 + 4 dx ∫∫ Put x + 1 = y, so that dx = dy. Then 2 22 x + 2x + 5 dx = y + 2 dy ∫∫ 1 24 = yy + 4 + log y + y 2 + 4 +C [using 7.6.2 (ii)]22 12 =(x +1) x + 2x + 5 + 2 log x +1+ x 2 + 2x + 5 + C 2 Example 24 Find ∫ Solution Note that 3 − 2x − x 2 dx = ∫ 4 − (x +1) 2 dx ∫ Put x + 1 = y so that dx = dy. Thus 3 − 2x − x 2 dx =4 − y 2 dy ∫∫ 1 4 y2 –1 = y 4 − y + sin + C [using 7.6.2 (iii)]2 22 1 ⎛ x +1⎞2 –1 =(x +1) 3 − 2x − x + 2 sin + C⎜⎟ 2 ⎝ 2 ⎠ EXERCISE 7.7 Integrate the functions in Exercises 1 to 9. 1. 2 222. 3.4 − x 1 − 4xx + 4 x + 6 2 224. 5. 6.x + 4 x +11 − 4x − xx + 4 x −5 2 x 7. 22 9. 1 +8.1 + 3x − xx + 3x 9 Choose the correct answer in Exercises 10 to 11. 10. 1 + x 2 dx is equal to∫ x 21 2 (A) 1+ x + log ( x + 1 + x ) + C 22 33 22 22(B) (1 + x )2 + C (C) x (1 + x )2 + C 33 2 x 2 12(D) 1+ x + x log x + 1+ x 2 + C 22 11. x 2 − 8x + 7 dx is equal to∫12 (A) (x − 4) x −8x + 7 + 9log x − 4 + x 2 − 8x + 7 + C 2 12 (B) (x + 4) x −8x + 7 + 9log x + 4 + x 2 −8x + 7 + C 2 1 (C) (x − 4) x 2 −8x + 7 − 3 2log x − 4 + x 2 − 8x + 7 + C 2 12 9 (D) ( x − 4) x −8x + 7 − log x − 4 + x 2 − 8x + 7 + C 22 INTEGRALS 331 7.7 Definite Integral In the previous sections, we have studied about the indefinite integrals and discussed few methods of finding them including integrals of some special functions. In this section, we shall study what is called definite integral of a function. The definite integral ∫ ab has a unique value. A definite integral is denoted by f () x dx , where a is called the lower limit of the integral and b is called the upper limit of the integral. The definite integral is introduced either as the limit of a sum or if it has an anti derivative F in the interval [a, b], then its value is the difference between the values of F at the end points, i.e., F(b) – F(a). Here, we shall consider these two cases separately as discussed below: 7.7.1 Definite integral as the limit of a sum Let f be a continuous function defined on close interval [a, b]. Assume that all the values taken by the function are non negative, so the graph of the function is a curve above the x-axis. ∫ab The definite integral f ( ) is the area bounded by the curve y = f (x), thex dx ordinates x = a, x = b and the x-axis. To evaluate this area, consider the region PRSQP between this curve, x-axis and the ordinates x = a and x = b (Fig 7.2). Y X' X Y' Fig 7.2 Divide the interval [a, b] into n equal subintervals denoted by [x 0, x 1], [x 1, x 2] ,..., [x , x ], ..., [x , x ], where x = a, x = a + h, x = a + 2h, ... , x = a + rh and r – 1rn – 1n 012rb − a .x = b = a + nh or n = We note that as n → ∞, h → 0. nh The region PRSQP under consideration is the sum of n subregions, where each subregion is defined on subintervals [x , x ], r = 1, 2, 3, …, n. r – 1rFrom Fig 7.2, we have area of the rectangle (ABLC) < area of the region (ABDCA) < area of the rectangle (ABDM) ... (1) Evidently as xr – xr–1 → 0, i.e., h → 0 all the three areas shown in (1) become nearly equal to each other. Now we form the following sums. n−1 hf ( x )s = h [f(x ) + … + f (x )] = ∑ r ... (2)n0n - 1r= 0 n and S n = hf [( x1) + f (x2) +…+ f (xn )] = h∑ f (xr ) ... (3) r =1 Here, sn and S n denote the sum of areas of all lower rectangles and upper rectangles raised over subintervals [xr–1, xr] for r = 1, 2, 3, …, n, respectively. In view of the inequality (1) for an arbitrary subinterval [xr–1, xr], we have s < area of the region PRSQP < S... (4)nn As n →∞ strips become narrower and narrower, it is assumed that the limiting values of (2) and (3) are the same in both cases and the common limiting value is the required area under the curve. Symbolically, we write lim S lim s n = →∞n = area of the region PRSQP = ∫ bf () x dx ... (5)n→∞na It follows that this area is also the limiting value of any area which is between that of the rectangles below the curve and that of the rectangles above the curve. For the sake of convenience, we shall take rectangles with height equal to that of the curve at the left hand edge of each subinterval. Thus, we rewrite (5) as ∫b x dx = () f ( ) lim h [ fa + f (a + h) + ... + f (a + (n – 1) h] ah→0 ∫ab 1 or f () =(b – a) lim [ fa + f (a + h) + ... + f (a +(n – 1) h] ... (6)x dx () n→∞ n b – a → 0 as n →∞ where h = n The above expression (6) is known as the definition of definite integral as the limit of sum. Remark The value of the definite integral of a function over any particular interval depends on the function and the interval, but not on the variable of integration that we INTEGRALS 333 choose to represent the independent variable. If the independent variable is denoted by ∫ab ∫ ab t ()t or u instead of x, we simply write the integral as f () dt or fu du instead of b x dx∫ f ( ) . Hence, the variable of integration is called a dummy variable. a ∫02 Example 25 Find (x 2 +1) dx as the limit of a sum. Solution By definition ∫ab 1 f () dx = b – a) lim [ fa + f (a + h) + ... + f (a + (n – 1)x ( () h], n→∞ n b – a where, h = n 2–0 2 In this example, a = 0, b = 2, f (x) = x 2 + 1, h == nn Therefore, 2 1 242(n – 1)(x 2 +1) dx = 2lim [ f (0) + f () + f () + ... + f ( )]∫0 n→∞ nnn n 22 212 4 ⎛ (2n – 2) ⎞ 2 lim [1 + ( +1) + ( +1) + ...++1]= 22 ⎜ 2 ⎟ n→∞ nnnn⎝⎠ 11 22 2 = 2 lim [(1+ 1+ ... +1) +2 (2 + 4 + ... + (2n –2) ] →∞ 143n 244nn -n terms 1 22 22 2 = 2lim [n + (1 + 2 + ... + (n –1) ] n→∞ n 2 n 1 4(n −1) n (2n – 1)= 2lim [n +2 ] nn n 6→∞ 1 2(n −1) (2n –1) = 2lim [n + ] n→∞ n 3 n 211 414 = 2 lim [1 + (1 −)(2– )] = 2[1+] = →∞n 3 nn 33 334 MATHEMATICS ∫ 02 Example 26 Evaluate ex dx as the limit of a sum. Solution By definition 24 2n –2 21 ⎡⎤ nn nex dx = (2–0)lim ⎢e 0 + e + e +... + e ⎥ n→∞ n ∫0 ⎢⎥⎣⎦ 2 Using the sum to n terms of a G.P., where a = 1, r = en , we have 2 0 x e∫ dx = 2 lim n→∞ 2 2 1 – 1 [ n ne n ] = 2 lim n→∞ 1 n 2 2 – 1e ⎡ ⎢ ⎢ ⎤ ⎥ ⎥ 1ne − – 1ne⎣ ⎦ 22 ( e – 1) ( 1) h e − = 2⎡ ⎤ = e 2 – 1 [using 0 lim h→ h 1= ] – 1n e⎢ ⎥ lim n→∞ ⎢ ⎢ 2 ⎥ ⎥ 2⋅ ⎣ n ⎦ EXERCISE 7.8 Evaluate the following definite integrals as limit of sums. b 53 1. x dx 2. ( x +1) dx 3. x 2 dx ∫ a ∫ 0 ∫ 2 4 142 x 2 4. (x − x) dx 5. e dx 6. (x + ex ) dx ∫ 1 ∫ −1 ∫ 0 7.8 Fundamental Theorem of Calculus 7.8.1 Area function ∫ab We have defined f () dx as the area ofx the region bounded by the curve y = f(x), the ordinates x = a and x = b and x-axis. Let x be a given point in [a, b]. Then x f () x dx ∫a represents the area of the light shaded region Fig 7.3 INTEGRALS 335 in Fig 7.3 [Here it is assumed that f (x) > 0 for x ∈ [a, b], the assertion made below is equally true for other functions as well]. The area of this shaded region depends upon the value of x. In other words, the area of this shaded region is a function of x. We denote this function of x by A(x). We call the function A(x) as Area function and is given by A(x) = ∫ xf ( x) dx ... (1) a Based on this definition, the two basic fundamental theorems have been given. However, we only state them as their proofs are beyond the scope of this text book. 7.8.2 First fundamental theorem of integral calculus Theorem 1 Let f be a continuous function on the closed interval [a, b] and let A (x) be the area function. Then A′(x) = f (x), for all x ∈[a, b]. 7.8.3 Second fundamental theorem of integral calculus We state below an important theorem which enables us to evaluate definite integrals by making use of anti derivative. Theorem 2 Let f be continuous function defined on the closed interval [a, b] and F be b an anti derivative of f. Then ∫ f (x) dx = [F(x )] b = F (b) – F(a). a a Remarks ∫ ab (i) In words, the Theorem 2 tells us that f () dxx = (value of the anti derivative F of f at the upper limit b – value of the same anti derivative at the lower limit a). (ii) This theorem is very useful, because it gives us a method of calculating the definite integral more easily, without calculating the limit of a sum. (iii) The crucial operation in evaluating a definite integral is that of finding a function whose derivative is equal to the integrand. This strengthens the relationship between differentiation and integration. ∫ ab (iv) In f () dxx , the function f needs to be well defined and continuous in [a, b]. 1 For instance, the consideration of definite integral 3 x( x 2 – 1)2 dx is erroneous∫− 2 1 2since the function f expressed by f(x) = xx( 2 –1) is not defined in a portion – 1 < x < 1 of the closed interval [– 2, 3]. 336 MATHEMATICS ∫ ab Steps for calculating f () dx .x f ()dx (i) Find the indefinite integral x . Let this be F(x). There is no need to keep∫ integration constant C because if we consider F(x) + C instead of F(x), we get ∫ ab f () dx = [F( ) + C] ba = [F( ) + a + C] = ba .xx b C] –[F( ) F( )– F( ) Thus, the arbitrary constant disappears in evaluating the value of the definite integral. ∫ ab (ii) Evaluate F(b) – F(a) = [F( )]xb , which is the value of f () dx .ax We now consider some examples Example 27 Evaluate the following integrals: 39 x dx (i) ∫2 x 2 dx (ii) ∫ 34 2(30 – x )2 2 x dx π 3(iii) ∫ (iv) ∫ 4sin 2 t cos 2 t dt 1(x +1) ( x + 2) 0 Solution 3 22 x (i) Let I = ∫ 3 x dx . Since x dx == F( ) ,2 ∫ x 3 Therefore, by the second fundamental theorem, we get 27 8 19 I = F(3)– F(2) = – = 3 33 (ii) Let I = ∫ 9 x 3 dx . We first find the anti derivative of the integrand. 4 2(30 – x )2 323 Put 30– x2 = t. Then – x dx =dt or x dx = – dt 23 ⎡⎤ 21x 2 dt ⎡⎤ 2 ⎢ 1 ⎥ xThus, dx = – = ⎢⎥ = = F( ) ∫ 3 ∫2 ⎢ 3 ⎥3 t 33 t ⎣⎦(30 – x2 )2 ⎢⎣(30 – x 2) ⎥⎦ INTEGRALS 337 Therefore, by the second fundamental theorem of calculus, we have ⎡⎤9 2 ⎢ 1 ⎥ I = F(9) – F(4) = ⎢ 3 ⎥3 ⎢ (30 – x2) ⎥⎣⎦4 2 ⎡ 11 ⎤ 2 ⎡11 ⎤ 19 = ⎢ − ⎥ = ⎢ − ⎥ = 3 ⎣(30– 27) 30– 8 ⎦3 ⎣3 22 ⎦ 99 2 x dx (iii) Let I = ∫1( x +1) ( x + 2) x –1 2 Using partial fraction, we get =+ (x +1) ( x + 2) x +1 x + 2 x dx x +1 + 2 log x + 2 = F( ) xSo ∫ = – log (x + 1) ( x + 2) Therefore, by the second fundamental theorem of calculus, we have I = F(2) – F(1) = [– log 3 + 2 log 4] – [– log 2 + 2 log 3] ⎛ 32 ⎞ =– 3 log 3 + log 2 + 2 log 4 = log ⎜⎟⎝ 27 ⎠ π = ∫ 04 ∫(iv) Let I sin 3 2t cos2 t dt . Consider sin 3 2t cos2 t dt 1 Put sin 2t = u so that 2 cos 2t dt = du or cos 2t dt = du 23 13 So sin 2t cos2 t dt = ∫u du ∫2 1 41 4 =[u ] = sin 2 = tt F( )say 88 Therefore, by the second fundamental theorem of integral calculus π 14 π 41 I =F( )–F(0) = [sin –sin 0] = 482 8 EXERCISE 7.9 Evaluate the definite integrals in Exercises 1 to 20. 1. ( x +1) dx 2. dx 3. (4 x –5 x + 6x + 9) dx ∫ − 11∫ 23 1 x ∫ 123 2 π 4. 4sin 2x dx 5. 2 cos 2x dx 6. e xdx 7. 4 tan x dx ∫ 0 ∫ π ∫ 45 ∫ π 00 π 3 dx 41 dx 1 dx 8. cosec x dx 9. 10. 11. ∫ 22∫ 2∫ π ∫ 02 01 x −1 6 1– x + x π 3 x dx 12x + 3 12 12. 2 cos 2 x dx 13. ∫ 2 14. ∫ 2 dx 15. ∫ xe x dx ∫ 20 00 x +15x + 1 π2 2 π xx5x 23 22416. ∫ 2 17. ∫ (2 sec x + x + 2) dx 18. ∫ (sin –cos ) dx 10 0 x + 4x + 3 22 1 π26x + 3 x 19. dx 20. (xe x + sin ) dx ∫ 2 ∫0 x + 4 04 Choose the correct answer in Exercises 21 and 22. 21. equals∫ 3 dx 211+ x π 2ππ π (A) (B) (C) (D)3 36 12 2 3 dx 22. ∫ 2 equals04 + 9 x π πππ (A) (B) (C) (D)6 12 24 4 7.9 Evaluation of Definite Integrals by Substitution In the previous sections, we have discussed several methods for finding the indefinite integral. One of the important methods for finding the indefinite integral is the method of substitution. INTEGRALS 339 ∫ ab To evaluate f () dx , by substitution, the steps could be as follows:x 1. Consider the integral without limits and substitute, y = f (x) or x = g(y) to reduce the given integral to a known form. 2. Integrate the new integrand with respect to the new variable without mentioning the constant of integration. 3. Resubstitute for the new variable and write the answer in terms of the original variable. 4. Find the values of answers obtained in (3) at the given limits of integral and find the difference of the values at the upper and lower limits. Let us illustrate this by examples. ∫ 1 Example 28 Evaluate 5x 4 x 5 +1 dx . −1 Solution Put t = x5 + 1, then dt = 5x4 dx. 33 2225 2Therefore, ∫5x 4 x 5 +1 dx = t dt = t = ( x +1) ∫33 ⎡ 3 ⎤ 1 45 25 Hence, 5xx +1 dx = ⎢( x + 1) 2 ⎥∫− 11 3 ⎢⎥⎣⎦–1 ⎡ 33 ⎤25 522 = ⎢(1 +1) – ((– 1) +1) ⎥ 3 ⎢⎣ ⎥⎦ 2 ⎡ 33 ⎤ 2 42 = ⎢22 − 02 ⎥ = (2 2) = 3 33⎢⎥⎣⎦Alternatively, first we transform the integral and then evaluate the transformed integral with new limits. Let t = x 5 + 1. Then dt = 5 x 4 dx. Note that, when x = – 1, t = 0 and when x = 1, t = 2 Thus, as x varies from – 1 to 1, t varies from 0 to 2 2 45 Therefore ∫15xx +1 dx = ∫ t dt −10 3 33⎡⎤2 ⎡⎤22 2 422 22 = ⎢t ⎥ = ⎢2 –0 ⎥ = (2 2) = 33 33⎢⎥⎢ ⎥⎣⎦0 ⎣⎦–1 1 tan x Example 29 Evaluate dx ∫ 201 + x Solution Let t = tan – 1 x, then dt = 12 dx . The new limits are, when x = 0, t = 0 and 1+ x ππ when x = 1, t = . Thus, as x varies from 0 to 1, t varies from 0 to . 44 π –1 2422 1 tan x 4 π ⎡t ⎤ 1 ⎡π ⎤ π Therefore dx = ∫t dt ⎢⎥ = ⎢ –0 ⎥ =∫ 201+ x 0 2 216 32 ⎣⎦0 ⎣⎦ EXERCISE 7.10 Evaluate the integrals in Exercises 1 to 8 using substitution. π 1 x 1 –1 ⎛ 2 x ⎞ 2 5 sin dx dx x +10 1. ∫ 02 2. ∫ sin φ cos φ d φ 3. ∫ 0 ⎜ 2 ⎟⎝ 1+ x ⎠ π sin x 4. ∫2 xx + 2 (Put x + 2 = t2) 5. ∫ 22 dx 00 1 + cos x 2 dx 1 dx 2 ⎛ 11 ⎞ 2x 6. 7. 2 8. –2 e dx ∫ 2 ∫ ∫⎜⎟0 −11x + 4– xx + 2x + 5 ⎝ x 2x ⎠ Choose the correct answer in Exercises 9 and 10. 1 31(x − x 3)9. The value of the integral dx is∫1 4 x 3 (A)6 (B)0 (C)3 (D)4 10. If f (x) = t sin t dt , then f′(x) is∫ 0 x (A) cosx + x sin x (B) x sinx (C) x cosx (D) sinx + x cosx INTEGRALS 341 7.10 Some Properties of Definite Integrals We list below some important properties of definite integrals. These will be useful in evaluating the definite integrals more easily. bb P: f xdx = f () dt () t 0 ∫ a ∫ a P: f xdx = – f xdx . In particular, f () dx = 0() () x 1 ∫ b ∫ a ∫ a aab bcb P : f xdx = f () dx + f () dx () xx 2∫ a ∫ a ∫ c () − )P : f xdx = f (a + b xdx 3∫ b ∫ b aa P : f xdx = f (() a − x) dx 4∫ 0 a ∫0 a (Note that P4 is a particular case of P3) 2aaa P : f xdx = f () dx + fa − x) dx () x (2 5∫ 0 ∫ 0 ∫ 0 2aa () () = fxP : f xdx = 2 f xdx , if f (2 a − x) () and6∫ 0 ∫0 0 if f (2a – x) = – f (x) P : (i) f () dx = 2 f () x xdx , if f is an even function, i.e., if f (– x) = f (x).7∫ − aa ∫ 0 a (ii) f () dx = 0, if f is an odd function, i.e., if f (– x) = – f (x).x∫ − aa We give the proofs of these properties one by one. Proof of P0 It follows directly by making the substitution x = t. Proof of P1 Let F be anti derivative of f. Then, by the second fundamental theorem of ∫ ab ∫ ba have x F()–F( ) [F() b =− f () calculus, we f () dx = ba = – a − F( )] x dx ∫ aa x 0.Here, we observe that, if a = b, then f () dx = Proof of P2 Let F be anti derivative of f. Then ∫b f () x dx = F(b) – F(a) ... (1) a ∫ac f () x dx = F(c) – F(a) ... (2) ∫cb and f () x dx = F(b) – F(c) ... (3) cb b xdx xdx () Adding (2) and (3), we get f () + f () = F( )–F( ) ba = f xdx ∫a ∫c ∫a This proves the property P2. Proof of P3 Let t = a + b – x. Then dt = – dx. When x = a, t = b and when x = b, t = a. Therefore ∫ab ∫ ba f () dx = − f (a + b – t)x dt b = ∫f (a + b – t) dt (by P1) a = f (a + b – x) dx by P∫ b 0a Proof of P4 Put t = a – x. Then dt = – dx. When x = 0, t = a and when x = a, t = 0. Now proceed as in P3. 2aa 2a Proof of P Using P, we have f () dx = f xdx + f () x () x dx . 5 2 ∫0 ∫∫ a0 Let t = 2a – x in the second integral on the right hand side. Then dt =– dx. When x = a, t = a and when x = 2a, t = 0. Also x = 2a – t. Therefore, the second integral becomes 2a 0 aa f () dx =– f (2 a ) = f (2 a – t) dt f (2 – x) dx x – t dt = a∫a ∫a ∫0 ∫ 0 2a aa Hence f () x dx = f x dx + f (2 () a − x) dx ∫0 ∫0 ∫0 2a aa fxx dx Proof of P Using P, we have ( ) dx = f () dx + f (2 a − x) ... (1)65∫ 0 ∫ 0 ∫0 Now, if f (2a – x) = f (x), then (1) becomes 2aaa a f () = f x dx + f () dx = 2 f () x dx () x xdx ,∫0 ∫∫ 0 ∫00 and if f(2a – x) =– f (x), then (1) becomes 2a aa f () x = f dx − f () dx () x xdx = 0∫∫ 0 ∫ 00 Proof of P7 Using P2, we have af () x dx = ∫ 0 f () x dx + ∫ af () x dx . Then∫a− a − 0 Let t =– x in the first integral on the right hand side. dt =– dx. When x = – a, t = a and when x = 0, t = 0. Also x = – t. INTEGRALS 343 a 0 a Therefore f () dx =– f (– ) dt + fxxt () dx ∫− a ∫a ∫ 0 = f (– x) dx + f xdx ) ... (1)( ) (by P0∫ 0 a ∫0 a (i) Now, if f is an even function, then f (–x) = f (x) and so (1) becomes aaa a f () dx = f () dx + f xdx = 2x () f () dx xx∫ − a ∫ 0 ∫ 0 ∫ 0 (ii) If f is an odd function, then f (–x) = – f(x) and so (1) becomes a aa () =− f () + f xdx = 0f xdx xdx () ∫− a ∫ 0 ∫0 3Example 30 Evaluate x – x dx ∫− 21 Solution We note that x3 – x ≥ 0 on [– 1, 0] and x3 – x ≤ 0 on [0, 1] and that x3 – x ≥ 0 on [1, 2]. So by P we write 201 23 3 33 x – x dx =( x – x) dx + –( x – x) dx + ( x – x) dx ∫− 21 ∫−1 ∫ 0 ∫1 0 123 33 =( x – x) dx + (x – x ) dx + (x – x) dx ∫−1 ∫ 0 ∫1 0 1242 2442⎡ xx ⎤⎡ xx ⎤⎡ xx ⎤ – + – + –= ⎢⎥⎢ ⎥⎢⎥ 42 2442⎣⎦ –1 ⎣⎦0 ⎣⎦1 ⎛ 11 ⎞⎛ 11 ⎞⎛ 11 ⎞ –– + – +(4–2 ) ––= ⎜⎟⎜⎟ ⎜⎟⎝ 42 ⎠⎝ 24 ⎠⎝ 42 ⎠ 1111 11 33 11 =– ++ −+ 2 −+ = −+ 2 = 4224 4224 4 π Example 31 Evaluate 4 sin 2 x dx ∫ – π 4 Solution We observe that sin2 x is an even function. Therefore, by P7 (i), we get π π 4 sin 2 x dx 2 4 sin 2 x dx =∫– π ∫ 0 4 344 MATHEMATICS π (1 − cos 2 x) π =2 ∫04 2 dx = ∫ 4 (1 − cos2 )dx x 0 π ⎡ 1 ⎤ 4 ⎛ π 1 π ⎞ π 1 = x – sin 2 x = ⎜ – sin ⎟ –0 = –⎢⎥⎣ 2 ⎦0 ⎝ 42 2 ⎠ 42 π x sin x Example 32 Evaluate dx ∫ 201 + cos x π xsin x Solution Let I = ∫ 02 dx . Then, by P4, we have 1 + cos x π (π− x)sin ( π− x) dx I = ∫ 201 + cos (π− x) π (π− x)sin x dx π sin x dx = = π− I∫2 ∫01+ cos x 01 + cos 2 x π sin x dx or 2 I = π ∫ 201 + cos x ππ sin x dx or I = ∫ 22 01 + cos x Put cos x = t so that – sin x dx = dt. When x = 0, t = 1 and when x = π, t = – 1. Therefore, (by P1) we get – π−1 dt π 1 dt I = ∫1 2= ∫ −1221 + t 21 + t 1 dt 1 = π ∫2 (by P, 2 is even function)since 01 71+ t + t2 –1 –1 −1 ⎡π ⎤ π = π ⎡tan t⎤1 =π ⎡tan 1–tan 0⎤ =π –0 =⎣⎦0 ⎣ ⎦⎢4 ⎥⎣⎦ 4 Example 33 Evaluate sin 5 x cos 4 x dx ∫− 11 Solution Let I = 1sin 5 xcos 4 x dx . Let f(x) = sin5 x cos4 x. Then∫−1 f (– x) = sin5 (– x) cos4 (– x) = – sin5 x cos4 x = – f (x), i.e., f is an odd function. Therefore, by P7 (ii), I = 0 INTEGRALS 345 π sin 4 x Example 34 Evaluate 2 dx ∫ 0 sin 4 x + cos 4 x π 2 sin 4 x Solution Let I = dx ... (1)∫ 440 sin x + cos x Then, by P4 4 π π sin ( − x) π 4 2 2 cos xdx 2I = ∫ = 4 dx ... (2)04 π 4 π ∫04 cos x + sin xsin ( − x) + cos ( − x) 22 Adding (1) and (2), we get π ππ sin 4 x + cos 4 x 2 π 2I = 2 dx = dx = [] 2 x =∫ 44 ∫0 00sin x + cos x 2 π Hence I = 4 π ∫ 3 dx Example 35 Evaluate π 1 + tan x 6 ππ cos x dx 3 dx 3Solution Let I = = ... (1)∫ π ∫ π1 + tan x cos x + sin x 66 ⎛ ππ ⎞ π cos +− x dx ⎜⎟ 3 ⎝ 36 ⎠ Then, by P3 I = ∫ π ⎛ ππ ⎞⎛ ππ ⎞ 6 cos +− x + sin +− x⎜ ⎟⎜⎟⎝ 36 ⎠⎝ 36 ⎠ π 3 sin x = dx ... (2)∫ π sin x + cos x 6 Adding (1) and (2), we get ππ πππ33 π 2I = dx =[ ] x =−= . Hence I =∫ ππ 366 12 66 π Example 36 Evaluate 2 log sin x dx ∫ 0 π Solution Let I = 2 logsin x dx ∫0 Then, by P4 ππ ⎛ π ⎞I = 2 logsin − x dx = 2 log cos x dx ∫ 0 ⎜ ⎟∫ 0⎝ 2 ⎠ Adding the two values of I, we get π 2I = ∫ 02 ( log sin x + log cos x) dx π =2 ( log sin x cos x + log 2 − log 2 ) dx (by adding and subtracting log 2) ∫ 0 ππ = 2log sin2 x dx − 2log2 dx (Why?)∫0 ∫0 π Put 2x = t in the first integral. Then 2 dx = dt, when x = 0, t = 0 and when x = , 2 t = π. 1 ππ Therefore 2I = log sin t dt − log 2 2 ∫ 0 2 π 2 π = 2 log sin t dt − log2 [by P6 as sin (π – t) = sin t)2 ∫02 = 2logsin x dx − log 2 (by changing variable t to x)∫0 ππ 2 π I − log 2 = 2 π – π Hence ∫02 log sin x dx = 2 log2 . INTEGRALS 347 EXERCISE 7.11 By using the properties of definite integrals, evaluate the integrals in Exercises 1 to 19. 3 1. 22 0 cos π ∫ x dx 2. 2 0 π ∫ dx 3. 2 2 3 30 2 2 sin sin cos x dx x π + ∫ x 4. 2 0 π ∫ 5 5 5 cos sin cos x dx x + x 5. 5 5 | x − +∫ 2 | dx 6. 8 2∫ 5x − dx 7. 1 0 (1 )n x x dx −∫ 8. 4 0 log (1 tan π +∫ x) dx 9. 2 0 x∫ π π 10. 2 0 (2 log sin ∫ log sin 2 ) x x dx − 11. ∫ 22 – sin π x dx 2 π 12. 0 1 sin x dx π +∫ x 13. ∫ 2 – π 7sin x dx 14. 2 5 0 cos x dx π ∫ 2 π 15. 2 0∫ sin cos 1 sin cos x x x x − + dx 16. 0 log (1 cos x) dx π +∫ 17. 0 a ∫ x dx ∫ 04 x −1 dx 18. 19. Show that f ()() xg x dx = 2 f () x dx , if f and g are defined as f(x) = f(a – x)∫0 a ∫0 a and g(x) + g(a – x) = 4 Choose the correct answer in Exercises 20 and 21. π 23 520. The value of ( x + x cos x + tan x + 1) dx is∫−π 2 (A)0 (B)2 (C) π (D) 1 π 2 ⎛ 4 + 3 sin x ⎞ 21. The value of ∫0 log ⎜⎟ dx is ⎝ 4 + 3 cos x ⎠ 3 (A)2 (B) (C)0 (D)–2 4 Miscellaneous Examples Example 37 Find cos 6 x∫ Solution Put t = 1 + sin 6x, so that dt = 6 cos 6x dx 1 ∫ 16 = t 2dt Therefore cos 6 x ∫ 33 12 1 = × ( ) 2 + C= (1 + x 2 + Ct sin6 ) 63 9 1 (x 4 − x)4 Example 38 Find dx ∫ 5 x 1 11 4 (1 − )4 (x − x)4 3 Solution We have xdx = dx ∫ 5 ∫ 4 xx Put 1− 13 =1– x –3 = t, so that 34 dx = dt xx 15 4(x − x)411 1454 4 ⎛ 1 ⎞4 Therefore dx = t 4 dt = × t + C= 1 −+ C∫ 5 ∫⎜ 3 ⎟ x 3 35 15 ⎝ x ⎠ 4 x dx Example 39 Find ∫ 2(x − 1) ( x +1) Solution We have x 41 =(x +1) + 2 32(x −1)( x +1) x − x + x −1 1 =(x +1) + ... (1)(x −1) ( x 2 + 1) 1 ABx + C Now express = + ... (2)(x −1)( x 2 +1) (x −1) ( x 2 +1) INTEGRALS 349 So 1 =A (x 2 + 1) + (Bx + C) (x – 1) = (A + B) x 2 + (C – B) x + A – C Equating coefficients on both sides, we get A + B = 0, C – B = 0 and A – C = 1, 11which give A = ,B = C – . Substituting values of A, B and C in (2), we get = 22 1 11 x 1 2 = − 2 − 2 ... (3)(x −1) ( x +1) 2( x −1) 2(x +1) 2( x +1) Again, substituting (3) in (1), we have x 4 11 x 1 =(x +1) +− − 2 22(x −1) ( x + x +1) 2( x −1) 2(x +1) 2( x +1) Therefore x 4 x 21 1 2 1–1 dx =+ x + log x −1 – log ( x +1)– tan x + C∫ 2(x −1) ( x + x + 1) 224 2 ⎡ 1 ⎤ Example 40 Find ⎢log (log x) + ⎥ dx ∫ 2(log x)⎣⎦ ⎡ 1 ⎤ Solution Let I = ∫ log (log x) + ⎥ dx ⎢ 2(log x)⎣⎦ = log (log x) dx + dx ∫∫ 12(log x) In the first integral, let us take 1 as the second function. Then integrating it by parts, we get I = x log (log x) − x dx +∫ 1 ∫ dx 2 x log x (log x) dx dx = x log (log x)−+ ... (1)∫∫ 2log x (log x) ∫ dx Again, consider , take 1 as the second function and integrate it by parts, log x dx ⎡ x ⎧ 1 ⎛ 1 ⎞⎫ ⎤ – x – dx we have ∫ = ⎢ ∫⎨ ⎜⎟⎬ ⎥ ... (2)log x ⎣ log x (log x)2 ⎝ x ⎠⎭ ⎥⎦⎢⎩ Putting (2) in (1), we get xdx dx x I = xlog (log x) −− + = x log (log x) −+ C∫ 2 ∫2log x (log x) (log x) log x Example 41 Find ∫⎡⎣ Solution We have Put tan x = t2, so that sec2 x dx = 2t dt 2t dt or dx = 1+ t 4 ⎛ 1 ⎞ 2t Then I = t 1 + dt∫⎜ 2 ⎟ 4⎝ t ⎠ (1 + t ) ⎛ 1 ⎞⎛ 1 ⎞ 1 + dt 1+ dt2 ⎜⎟ ⎜⎟(t +1) ⎝ t 2 ⎠⎝ t 2 ⎠2 dt =2 =2= ∫ 4 ∫∫ 2 t +1 ⎛ 1 ⎞2 ⎛ 1 ⎞⎜ t + ⎟ t −+ 2 t 2 ⎜⎟⎝ ⎠⎝ t ⎠ 1 ⎛ 1 ⎞ Put t − = y, so that ⎜1 + 2 ⎟ dt = dy. Then t ⎝ t ⎠ ⎛ 1 ⎞ t −⎜⎟dy y –1 ⎝ t ⎠I = 2 = 2 tan – 1 + C= 2tan + C∫ y 2 +( 2 )22 2 ⎛ 2 − ⎞ –1 ⎛ tan x −1 ⎞–1 t 1 = 2 tan + C= 2tan + C⎜ ⎟⎜ ⎟ 2 t ⎠⎝ 2 tan x ⎠ sin 2xcos 2 x dx ⎝ Example 42 Find ∫ 9 – cos 4 (2 x) sin 2 xcos 2x Solution Let I = dx∫ 49–cos 2x INTEGRALS 351 Put cos2 (2x) = t so that 4 sin 2x cos 2x dx = – dt 1 dt 1 –1 ⎛ t ⎞ 1 − 1 ⎡12 ⎤ Therefore I = – = – sin + C =− sin cos 2x + C⎜⎟ ⎢⎥∫4 24 ⎝ 3 ⎠ 4 ⎣ 3 ⎦9– t 3 Example 43 Evaluate 2 x sin ( π x) dx ∫ − 1 ⎧x sin π x for −1 ≤ x ≤ 1 ⎪ Solution Here f (x) = | x sin πx | = ⎨ 3 −x sin π x for 1 ≤ x ≤⎪⎩ 2 33 Therefore | x sin π x | dx = x sin π x dx +− x sin π x dx ∫− 21 ∫ − 11 ∫ 12 3 x sin π x dx − 2 x sin π x dx = ∫ 1 ∫−11 Integrating both integrals on righthand side, we get 3 31 2 ⎡ – x cos π x sin π x⎤⎡ −x cos π x sin π x ⎤2 | x sin π x | dx +− +∫−1 = ⎢ 2 ⎥⎢ 2 ⎥⎣ ππ ⎦− 1 ⎣ ππ ⎦1 2 ⎡ 11 ⎤ 31 = −−− =+⎢ 2 ⎥ 2π ⎣ ππ⎦ ππ π x dx Example 44 Evaluate ∫ 22 220 a cos x + b sin x π x dx π (π− x) dx Solution Let I = ∫ 22 22 = ∫ 2 2 2 2 (using P4)0 a cos x + b sin x 0 a cos ( π− x)+ b sin (π− x) π dx π x dx = π−∫ 22 22 ∫ 22 220 a cos x + b sin x 0 a cos x + b sin x ∫ 0 π dx = π− I 22 22 a cos x + b sin x ∫ π dx Thus 2I = π 22 220 a cos x + b sin x π ππ dx π 2 dx or I = =⋅2 (using P)∫ 22 22 ∫ 2222 620 a cos x + b sin x 20 a cos x + b sin x ⎡ π π ⎤ 4 dx 2 dx π⎢ + ⎥∫ 22 22 ∫ 22 22= 0 a cos x + b sin x π a cos x + b sin x⎢ ⎥⎣ ⎦ 4 ⎡ π π ⎤ 4 sec 2 xdx 2 cosec 2 xdx π⎢ + ⎥= ∫ 22 2 ∫ 22 2⎢ 0 a + b tan x π a cot x + b ⎥⎣ ⎦ 4 ⎡ 1 dt 0 du ⎤ = π− ( put tan x = t and cot x = u)⎢∫ 2 22 ∫ 22 2 ⎥⎣ 0 a + bt 1 au + b ⎦ 10 2π ⎡ –1 bt ⎤ π ⎡ –1 au ⎤ π ⎡ –1 b –1 a ⎤ π = ⎢tan ⎥ – ⎢tan ⎥ = ⎢tan + tan ⎥ = ab ⎣ a ⎦0 ab ⎣ b⎦1 ab ⎣ ab ⎦ 2ab Miscellaneous Exercise on Chapter 7 Integrate the functions in Exercises 1 to 24. 1 1 1 a 1. 3 x − x 2. x a+ + x b+ 3. x 2 ax − x [Hint:Putx = t ] 1 1 1 1 4. 2 4(x x 3 41) + 5. 1 2x 1 3+ x [Hint: 1 2x 1 3x+ = 1 3 1x ⎛ +⎜⎜⎝ 1 6x ⎞ ⎟⎟⎠ , put x = t6] 5 x sin x 5 log x e 4 log x e− 6. 2( 1) ( x x+ 9) + 7. sin ( x )− a 8. 3 log x e 2 log x e− cos x 8sin 8 cos − x 1 9. 4 2sin x− 10. 21 2 sin − 2 cos x x 11. cos ( ) cos ( )x a x b+ + 3 x x e 1 12. 1 − x 8 13. (1 ) (2 )x x e e+ + 14. 2(x 21) ( x+ 4) + elog sinxe3 logx15. cos3 x 16. (x4 + 1)– 1 17. f ′ (ax + b) [f (ax + b)]n 1 − 1sin x −cos − 1 x 18. 3 19. − 1 , x ∈ [0, 1]sin x sin ( x +α ) sin x + cos −1 x INTEGRALS 353 1 − x 2 + sin 2 x x 2 + x +1 20. 21. ex 22. 2 1 + x 1 + cos 2 x (x +1) (x + 2) − x 2 +1 log ( x 2 +1) ⎡ − 2 log x⎤ –1 1 x ⎣ ⎦23. tan 24. 1 + xx 4 Evaluate the definite integrals in Exercises 25 to 33. 2π x ⎛ 1 − sin x ⎞ 4 π sin x cos x 2 π cos x dx 25. ∫ π e ⎜⎟dx 26. dx 27. 1− cos x ∫ 04 4 ∫ 02 2⎝⎠ cos x + sin x cos x + 4 sin x 2 π π sin x + cos x 1 dx sin x + cos x 28. 3 dx 29. 30. 4 dx ∫ π sin 2 x ∫ 01+ x − x ∫ 09 + 16 sin 2 x 6 π π x tan x 2 −131. sin 2 x tan (sin x) dx 32. ∫ dx 0∫ 0 sec x + tan x ∫ 14 33. [ x −1| + | x − 2| + | x − 3|] dx Prove the following (Exercises 34 to 39) 3 dx 22 1 x 34. =+ log 35. xe dx =1∫ 12 ∫ 0x ( x +1) 3 3 π 17 4 2 36. x cos x dx = 0 37. 2 sin 3 x dx =∫ − 11 ∫ 03 π 31 − 1 π 38. 42 tan x dx =1 − log 2 39. sin x dx =−1 0∫ 0 ∫ 2 ∫01 2−3 x40. Evaluate e dx as a limit of a sum. Choose the correct answers in Exercises 41 to 44. 41. is equal todx ∫x − x e + e (A) tan–1 (ex) + C (B) tan–1 (e–x) + C (C) log (ex – e–x) + C (D) log (ex + e–x) + C cos2 x 42. dx is equal to∫2(sin x + cos x) –1 (A) + C (B) log |sin x + cos x | + C sin x + cos x 1 (C) log |sin x −cos x | + C (D) (sin x + cos x)2 354 MATHEMATICS ∫ab 43. If f (a + b – x) = f (x), then xf () x dx is equal to a + bb a + bb (A) f (b − x) dx (B) f (b + x) dx 2 ∫ a 2 ∫ a b − ab a + bb (C) f () x dx (D) f () dx x a2 ∫ a 2 ∫ 1 −1 ⎛ 2 x −1 ⎞ 44. The value of tan ⎟ is∫0 ⎜ 2 dx ⎝1 + x − x ⎠ π (A)1 (B)0 (C)–1 (D) 4 Summary � Integration is the inverse process of differentiation. In the differential calculus, we are given a function and we have to find the derivative or differential of this function, but in the integral calculus, we are to find a function whose differential is given. Thus, integration is a process which is the inverse of differentiation. d ∫Let F() x = fx fxdx = F( ) ( ) . Then we write ( ) x + C . These integralsdx are called indefinite integrals or general integrals, C is called constant of integration. All these integrals differ by a constant. � From the geometric point of view, an indefinite integral is collection of family of curves, each of which is obtained by translating one of the curves parallel to itself upwards or downwards along the y-axis. � Some properties of indefinite integrals are as follows: 1. [ fx + g ( )] dx = f xdx + g () () x () x dx ∫ ∫∫ x = k () 2. For any real number k, kf () dx fxdx ∫∫ More generally, if f, f, f, ... , f are functions and k, k, ... ,k are real12 3n 12nnumbers. Then [kf () + kf x + ... () + kf ( )] dx x x∫ 11 22 nn = kf () dx + k f xdx + ... () + kf () dx x x1 ∫ 12 ∫ 2 n ∫ n

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